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  • in reply to: Belgian Order of Leopold – What time period? #17039
    kjohn
    Member

    John,
    Just read your entry, hope it is not too late.
    This style crown was used on the L1 Orders (Knight and Officer) from 1845 on by Buls (manufacturer). However, exact same style was used by Wolfers and Heremans starting around mid 1880’s (when Buls stopped working) until some time in late 1890’s. The difference would be evident by the manufacturer’s stamp (Buls used small rectangular mark with ‘B’ and tiny wreath beneath; the other 2 makers used none and quality was also not as good as Buls’s, especially the lions which got progressively worst as time went on).
    Hope this helps.
    I helped Antti with the Belgian book.
    Kris J.

    in reply to: Unknown Belgian Medal Box – Help Please #15593
    kjohn
    Member

    John,
    Also, this would be for the post 1951 type (with dual languages). It has both, French and Flemish on the cover.

    kjohn
    Member

    Chris,
    I am somewhat late to the discussion. What bothers me is that Emperor’s head is turned to the left where as most literature shows Emperor’s head turned to the right in all of the 1st Empire examples.
    I believe it may be a ‘transitional’ piece. I have seen couple of the ‘Biennais’ pieces with the head turned left but that was in the 1st type (of 1st Empire) and with very large head. Lovely cross in any case. Are there any punch marks on the suspension ring. Should have the ‘fascias’ mark to be of the 1st Empire period.
    KJ.

    kjohn
    Member

    Henk-Willem,
    Black stripe was not an official device so it’s meaning cannot be stated for certain.
    Button on ribbon is simply a personal arrangement of attachment. It also cannot be used to designate civilian/military recipient. Many older examples (1st Empire/Restoration of Monarchy) used a button-hole type ribbon arrangement to help with LOH attachment, this was occasionally used on neck badges of various States etc. Again, this was simply a recipient’s choice.

    Cases for 2nd Empire can be difficult to find and can cost as much as the badge itself. The most common example is in dark green-grayish box with full image of the insignia gold embossed on the lid (note that Officer case would actually show a rosette on the ribbon in comparison with Knight where no rosette is shown). This goes for the Official maker of the LOH during 2nd Empire- Quizille Lemoine. There were many other makers and cases range in color from red to white but those are not as common.
    Unfortunately I do not have any cases for sale. Good luck with your search.
    Kris

    kjohn
    Member

    Henk-Willem,
    Black stripe was not an official device so it’s meaning cannot be stated for certain.
    Button on ribbon is simply a personal arrangement of attachment. It also cannot be used to designate civilian/military recipient. Many older examples (1st Empire/Restoration of Monarchy) used a button-hole type ribbon arrangement to help with LOH attachment, this was occasionally used on neck badges of various States etc. Again, this was simply a recipient’s choice.

    Cases for 2nd Empire can be difficult to find and can cost as much as the badge itself. The most common example is in dark green-grayish box with full image of the insignia gold embossed on the lid (note that Officer case would actually show a rosette on the ribbon in comparison with Knight where no rosette is shown). This goes for the Official maker of the LOH during 2nd Empire- Quizille Lemoine. There were many other makers and cases range in color from red to white but those are not as common.
    Unfortunately I do not have any cases for sale. Good luck with your search.
    Kris

    kjohn
    Member

    Henk-Willem,
    Yes, it is a 3rd Republic period award (1870-1951). Button on ribbon is privately attached, black line is not official either but occasionally added to display of a deceased recipient’s award.
    To complete your document you’d need a 2nd Empire type (1852-1870). Let me know if you need one, I have few available.
    Kris

    kjohn
    Member

    Henk-Willem,
    Yes, it is a 3rd Republic period award (1870-1951). Button on ribbon is privately attached, black line is not official either but occasionally added to display of a deceased recipient’s award.
    To complete your document you’d need a 2nd Empire type (1852-1870). Let me know if you need one, I have few available.
    Kris

    kjohn
    Member

    Matthew,
    Your Knight class of the LOH dates from 2nd Republic (1848-51). It is proper for this type to lack the crown suspension.
    Hope this helps,
    Kris Johnston,
    jkmilitaria.com

    kjohn
    Member

    Matthew,
    Your Knight class of the LOH dates from 2nd Republic (1848-51). It is proper for this type to lack the crown suspension.
    Hope this helps,
    Kris Johnston,
    jkmilitaria.com

    in reply to: Photo Software #13174
    kjohn
    Member

    Ed,
    Certainly, scanner makes it considerably easier.
    It was a typo with the POS camera (shuld have been P&S of course), sorry.
    If one keeps the focus plane the same (distance and angle) – meaning fixed camera and background where object is placed – aspect ratio should remain same or very close.
    About your database – are you working with printed matter that cannot be scanned? There must be a way to achieve relatively decent results. If you have time – let me know some details – perhaps I can be of help.

    Kris Johnston

    in reply to: Photo Software #13172
    kjohn
    Member

    Hello,
    Many P&S (point and shoot) digital cameras have a built-in feature to compose multi framed images (normally used for wide landscape shots, where one cannot contain the whole width of the vista in one image). I am sure this will be covered in camera’s manual.
    This can be very handy to you. Once camera is configured to perform this function – you can simply shoot two frames. First frame of the obverse, flip your medal (group) around on the second shot. After the first shot – camera will show a half-screen of the already captured obverse so it can be overlapped – ignore the overlapp and just get close to the edge of the first capture and shoot the reverse.
    You will end up with single image containing both sides.
    While I agree with Ed that scanning will be better quality – not everyone has a scanner and/or ability to edit images in post (software).
    It will definitely help if your camera is stationary (avoid hand holding), use the Macro (focus) setting (usually indicated by a small icon of a flower) and a timer shutter release to reduce the shake. Once you master the process – it would not take long to capture many photos in the session.
    Lighting is another issue but you can easily make do in a moderatly well lit house interior. Avoid flash since it may be difficult to control. If you find your shots have a reddish/yellowish tinge to it -adjust your in camera colour balance (sometimes called white balance) to ‘Incandescent’ (regular household light – ofen indicated by small icon of a light bulb). This will make your shots look very close to what your eyes see.
    Hope this helps, I’d be happy to know how you made out.
    Kris Johnston

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)