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Viewing 15 posts - 331 through 345 (of 361 total)
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  • in reply to: medals for sale e-mails anyone else got one #14204
    jb floyd
    Moderator

    He is persistent and doesn’t seem to be concerned about the absence of a response.

    in reply to: Trying to find out what this is #13768
    jb floyd
    Moderator

    Not much value in the medal collecting world, no.

    in reply to: Trying to find out what this is #13770
    jb floyd
    Moderator

    It’s a prize from a German sport shooting competition. This style of prize medal (which will often have the prize level and/or town engraved on the reverse) was in use from the 1870s thtough the mid-1930s. The ribbon looks like it was originally green and white, which would indicate its origin was in Saxony.

    German shooting clubs were very common and they held regular competitions, so the medals are commonly found.

    in reply to: OMSA Convention discussions #13771
    jb floyd
    Moderator

    As of Monday morning, 11 July we have the following numbers for the convention in Jacksonville:

    121 registrants
    19 family members
    74 members taking 91 bourse tables
    11 competitive exhibits, 1 non-competitive, plus the OMSA exhibit

    Some procrastinaors will check in over the next month (and one or two at the door), but this is an excellent start. If you haven’t registered, please do so and come join us in Jacksonville.

    in reply to: Polish military uniform, circa 1932 #14100
    jb floyd
    Moderator

    The medals are fairly straightforward:

    Order Virtuti Militari
    Independence Cross
    Order Polonia Restituta
    Cross of Valor, with 3 bars
    Cross of Merit
    Commemorative Medal for the War 1918-1921]
    Medal for the 10th Anniversary of the Restoration of Independence

    The badge above the ribbons is the badge of the Inspector General of the Armed Forces.

    The identification of the regimental badges below the medals will take someone with better eyes than mine. Polish badges fairly intricate designs and many are distinguished by color and small details. Perhaps one of our Polish specialists can decipher those.

    in reply to: Madagascar Expedition Medal – 1895 #13986
    jb floyd
    Moderator

    None of my sources list criteria for the "1895" clasp, although they agree that the campaign dates started on 8 December 1894.

    The original expeditionary force was reinforced by an additional 15,000 combat troops in August 1895. This second landing may have triggered the need for the "1895" bar, although it seems illogical to add a bar for those who came late to the party and none for those who served for the entire time in a killer environment. French combat losses were around 25 killed, but several thousand men died of disease.

    in reply to: My new French ribbon bar #13900
    jb floyd
    Moderator

    Very nice!

    Don’t have much time to identify them all, but is that orange one the house order of Orange (NL)???

    More likely the Moroccan Order of Ouisam Alaouite. A better fit with his other French awards and what looks like the Spanish Medal for Peace in Morocco.

    in reply to: Albany, NY Spanish American war medal #13660
    jb floyd
    Moderator

    I had a pendant-only of this medal in white metal for years before I knew that most of the others were bronze. Such is the problem of no books, no internet and a small number of other collectors.

    in reply to: Please help with this medal. #13655
    jb floyd
    Moderator

    This is the pendant of the Order of Lafayette. This type was in use between the World Wars. The original order apparently died out in WWII, but a similarly-named order was created in 1958. This badge was used by the first order.

    Membership criteria are unclear. It was worn on a blue ribbon with red stripes on each side.

    in reply to: I Am A New Member and Need A Little Help #13620
    jb floyd
    Moderator

    CSC 427 went to Corporal William Maroney, Co C, 5th MG Bn, 2nd Division, who earned the DSC, 5 silver citation stars and the Croix de Guerre with gold star.

    in reply to: I Am A New Member and Need A Little Help #13618
    jb floyd
    Moderator

    What’s the CSC number?

    in reply to: purple heart naming #13614
    jb floyd
    Moderator

    This question will probably generate some interesting perspectives among collectors.

    Personally, I’d have the medal named. It’s going to stay in the family, I assume, and the addition of his name will help later generations connect to it. An unnamed medal becomes "dad’s grandpa’s medal", but a named medal is much more personal.

    I’d have a quality jeweler put at least his full name on it, and if place is available, I’d add the date of his wound and perhaps his unit. That’s a lot of info, but a good engraver can do it. These days, it will be machine-engraved, but you really don’t want to duplicate period engraving. Just have it done well.
    __________________

    in reply to: Salina, Kansas WW1 Commemorative Medal #13610
    jb floyd
    Moderator

    World War I brought with it great patriotic fervor, so when the troops came home from France, there were big celebrations, parades, picnics, etc. Part of the celebrations often included passing out medals. There are about 1300 known examples of local medals for World War I service. These come from counties, cities, schools, churches, labor unions and local neighnorhoods. A couple of companies (especially Whitehead & Hoag) were very aggressive in marketing their medals, so you’ll see similar designs from a number of places.
    There were also scrolls, watches, fobs, etc, given to the veterans.
    __________________

    in reply to: Gaps in the literature #13542
    jb floyd
    Moderator

    Christophe brings up a good point about where to find books. I am a dedicated user of http://www.addall.com, a worldwide book-search site that actually searches other book-search sites as well as book dealer inventories. By allowing you to search on keywords, as well as the basics of author and title, you can often find things that are not obvious from their title. And, it really allows you to do foreign language searches (unfortunately, only in the Latin alphabet as far as I know). I guess Google can do similar things on the web, but filtering out the unrelated sites that have the right keywords can be tedious.

    The language barrier certainly stops the laziest among us, but a little effort can solve a lot of those problems. If you can recognize about 50 medallic terms in the language, you have a very good chance of being able to capture the essence of most publications. If you can combine that with a little experience with the language, there is no reason to be blocked by any source written for the popular market. When I was in Germany, I found that learning the terms in George Nimmergut’s price guides allowed me to plow through most German sources with only a little help from dictionaries.

    As more and more Chinese-speaking collectors appear in the collecting community, I suspect that the absence of sources on Chinese medals will slowly be corrected. Li Gongqing [James Lee] published "Chinese Orders 1862-1955" in Canada in 2009, and I understand he has another volume coming out. His book has great photographs, which sort of the various grades and classes of orders. Not a lot of text beyond the names of the orders, unfortunately. It’s expensive, but a beautiful work.

    jb floyd
    Moderator

    Or Vatican Order of St. Gregory the Great.

Viewing 15 posts - 331 through 345 (of 361 total)