Viewing 15 posts - 211 through 225 (of 240 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #38685
    megan
    Moderator

    Aaarghhh! So sorry, I started researching firefighter medals… and the whole afternoon has disappeared as I gathered information and images. I’ll put them up next week!

    #38698
    megan
    Moderator

    As promised a heap of unofficial medals for firefighters. Lacking an official long service medal until 1954, a collection of organisations presented their own, generally with a silver medal for 20 years of full-time service and a bronze medal for fewer years of service. So today I have added medals handed out by the Association of Professional Fire Brigade Officers, the National Fire Brigades Association, the National Fire Brigades Union, and the British Fire Services Association.

    Next time, there will be a few of the awards made by local authorities to the firefighters they employed, of which I have found quite a few pictures (but very little information!).

    #38721
    megan
    Moderator

    Seeking additional images for British Fire Services Association awards, I found a new one which was established in 2015! So I added that too… and then as promised added a small collection of local authority fire brigade awards. Some are quite beautiful – although I did find two awards from different authorities with the same obverse! It would seem that medal manufacturers were quite happy to reuse dies for different customers.

    #38743
    megan
    Moderator

    Today I added the Colonial Fire Brigades Long Service Medal. No images of either the Elizabeth II versions alas – can anyone help me out?

    #38750
    megan
    Moderator

    After a fruitless search for any pictures of the Ceylon Fire Service Long Service and Good Conduct Medal, I turned my attention to medals for those working in the prison service. Whilst many other nations have recognised the work of correctional services, the UK has rather lagged behind. In 2002 a medal was instituted for the Northern Ireland Prison Service, more to recognise service during the Troubles; then in 2010 a proper long service and good conduct medal was instituted for the various prison services in the UK (Her Majesty’s Prison Service which serves England and Wales, the Northern Ireland Prison Service, Scottish Prison Service, and the prisons on Guernsey, Jersey, and the Isle of Man).

    #38773
    megan
    Moderator

    So sorry that I have been quiet for a while. On 17 March, my university closed its doors and took all teaching and assessment online due to the coronavirus scare. As my research area is… online learning, you can imagine that my services have been in demand by my colleagues in Computer Science, and I also set up and ran assessments for our ‘degree apprentices’ (part-time students sponsored by their employers) who were presenting their individual projects. And… my dear husband presented me with a brand new desktop PC! So that needed setting up and useful things like image editing software installed.

    To more interesting matters: the Long and Meritorious Service section of the UK part of the Images Databse is now complete, with the final medals – Belfast Harbour Police Medal, Colonial Prison Service Long Service Medal, South Africa Prisons Service Faithful Service Medal, and finally the South Africa Prisons Department Faithful Service Medal being added… not that I could find many images apart from the Colonial Prison Service one! Well, I did find one of the South African ones but it was on the wrong ribbon!

    Next up: British Royal Commemoratives 🙂

    #38869
    megan
    Moderator

    I’ve surfaced from setting up virtual assessments for 160-odd final projects for the full-time students (and am supposed to have 2 weeks’ leave but somehow I expect that to be eaten up!) to set up a new Royal Commemoratives section under the United Kingdom area of the Medals Database.

    Now, England and later the United Kingdom, has been producing commemorative medals for coronations and other royal events since at least 1547 but these took the form of table medals (i.e. not intended for wear) until the issue of the 1877 Empress of India Medal. So I have started there, and also added the Prince of Wales Visit to India Medal 1875-6. I’m delighted to have found plenty of images, including several uploaded here by our own Ed Haynes, a previous Image Database Manager! As he loves Indian medals, these may well be images of items in his own collection.

    #38957
    megan
    Moderator

    Having dipped her toe in the water, so to speak, with the Empress of India Medal, Queen Victoria embraced the idea of handing out medals to mark landmarks in her reign, and celebrated her Golden Jubilee on the throne with no less than 5 medals – a Jubilee Medal available in gold, silver, and bronze; and a special Jubiless Medal for the Police, with variants for the Metropolitan Police and the City of London Police. These are the 2 police forces that serve London, and who were kept busy during the massive celebrations!

    #38984
    megan
    Moderator

    Ten years later, in 1897, Queen Victoria celebrated her Diamond Jubilee and marked the occasion with a whole bunch of medals – a Jubilee Medal in gold, silver, and bronze; a special diamond-shaped medal for Mayors and Provosts in gold and silver; and a medal called the Jubilee (Police) Medal but also available to fire-fighters and ambulance crews… each with a different reverse. However, anyone who received the Jubilee Medal or the Jubilee (Police) Medal in 1887 and who qualified again for a 1897 award was given a clasp bearing the date 1897 rather than a second medal. I’ve found specimens of nearly all of them to share with you 🙂

    #38989
    megan
    Moderator

    Several other medals were awarded to mark Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee – by the colonies of Ceylon, Hong Kong, Lagos, and India. Oddly I could find both grades of the Ceylon award and one image from both Hong Kong and Lagos… but not a single Indian one!

    Next time a few Royal tours round off Victoria’s reign and then we start in on the Coronation and Jubilee Medals of the 20th century.

    #39014
    megan
    Moderator

    Two medals today: one commemorating a visit by Queen Victoria to Ireland and one marking a massive world tour undertaken by the Duke of York and Cornwall (later George V) in 1901. This tour spawned a number of locally-produced medals, for example one to mark his opening of the very first Australian parliament, but these are more commemmorative that offically-issued medals so I haven’t quite decided what to do with them!

    Next time, King George V gets crowned and there’s a whole spate of medals to mark that occasion!

    #39024
    megan
    Moderator

    Oops… almost forgot King Edward VII, who was crowned in 1902 (King George V was crownded in 1911)! Picking up on the precedent set by Queen Victoria at her Diamond Jubilee, he instituted 3 Coronation Medals – a general one in silver and bronze, one for Mayors and Provosts, and a whole bunch of Police ones for those police, fire and ambulance personnel involved in the Coronation celebrations… once they finally happened. The event was scheduled for 26 June 1902, but the poor king fell ill with appendicitis and was crowned on 9 August 1902 once he’d recovered.

    #39041
    megan
    Moderator

    A rather frustrating search for the medals issued by parts of the British Empire to mark King Edward VII’s coronation. There are medals from Ceylon, Hong Kong, and Natal – I only had much luck with the Hong Kong medal, and one of the ones from Natal. This last was quite interesting as they decided to differential between the different grades of the medal by issuing them in different sizes rather than different metals. However, only the middle grade – 29mm in diameter – which was given to local dignatories seems to be around. The larger on was presented to Native Chiefs (only a few of them) and the smaller to schoolchildren (presumably in great numbers but how many youngsters preserved them?).

    Next time, off on Royal travels beginning with India and the Delhi Durbar…

    #39130
    megan
    Moderator

    Today I have added the Delhi Durbar Medal 1903 – although despite a magnificent display being organised, King Edward VII did not attend. He did, however, make it to Scotland and Ireland, spending a couple of weeks in each and awarding a medal for both trips, mostly awarded to police officers involved in the celebrations and events that took place. The final medal for today is a commemorative and mostly unofficial one handed out by the Prince and Princess of Wales (later King George V and Queen Mary) who did manage to get to India a few years later.

    Speaking of King George V, next time we’ll look at the medals awarded for his coronation in 1911.

    #39156
    megan
    Moderator

    Two innovations with King George V’s Coronation Medal – it was awarded to people not present at the Coronation and it was awarded in silver to all recipients. The distribution model started a trend that has been continued in Royal medals to this day: as well as marking participation in the events, medals were parcelled out across all British territories where the local government was given free rein in deciding how to award them. However, as previously, a separate ‘Police’ medal was awarded – although to police officers throughout the United Kingdom as well as those on duty in London for the actual coronation – which had no less than 10 different reverses, inscribed appropriately.

    • This reply was modified 3 months, 2 weeks ago by megan. Reason: Corrected my spelling!
Viewing 15 posts - 211 through 225 (of 240 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.