Orders & Medals Society of America Forums Other Medal Related Topics Medals Wanted NEW ZEALAND CROSS SPECIMEN WANTED

This topic contains 21 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  sam steele 2 weeks ago.

Viewing 7 posts - 16 through 22 (of 22 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #37542

    sam steele
    Participant

    Three and a half years on, and I’m still looking for a specific New Zealand Cross copy. It was sold via Spink (Lot 412 of their 26 July 2017 sale in London). I owned it, and now wish it back.

    I am fortunate enough to have the cased specimen of the Cross ordered by the Minister of Defence in 1914. One of only 13 official specimens. Its twin is in the Otago Museum in Dunedin, N.Z.

    Cheers,

    Bill in Canada

    #37634

    sam steele
    Participant

    SUCCESS!

    I’ve snagged one of only 13 official specimens made from the original dies. Cased. What a beauty!

    This is the other old copy Cross that I’d like to have back. Not from the original dies, but it has age.

    Cheers,

    Bill in Canada

     

    Attachments:
    You must be logged in to view attached files.
    #37716

    steve johnston
    Participant

    Regarding the NZ Cross medal.

    Opinions on this one

    Attachments:
    You must be logged in to view attached files.
    #37718

    steve johnston
    Participant

    Another picture

    Attachments:
    You must be logged in to view attached files.
    #37720

    sam steele
    Participant

    Hi Steve,

     

    The first image shows a copy. The crown is of 1982 copy shape. The words NEW ZEALAND aren’t spaced correctly. The upper suspension ring is thin, and not the right shape. The suspender bar laurel is set too high on the bar. The four stars are cast, not die struck.

     

    The second image is also a copy. Recently made with some help from technology. The crown is not gold, and the detail is not right. The words NEW ZEALAND are too large. The wreath is not right. There is more precise detail in this Cross, but it’s been done with the assistance of a computer. These will be the dangerous ones to watch out for, as today’s technology gets further advanced. God help the collector in a hundred years, if a copyist gets his hands on a specimen made from the original dies.

    Cheers,

    Bill

    #37721

    steve johnston
    Participant

    Hi Bill,

    Thank you for getting back to me. I know they are copies but how do they compare to the 1980s versions . The detail is scary.

    Steve

    #37722

    sam steele
    Participant

    Hi Steve,

     

    In 1982, New Zealand Coin and Medal company approached the New Zealand Mint to make a new set of dies in order to produce 100 Crosses in 18ct gold and silver, just like the originals. An expensive proposition! After about 50, New Zealand Coin had the remaining dozen or so made by a local Kiwi jeweler (P&F Ltd.). As an aside, the N.Z. government was not amused that their replica of the Cross was labelled as an “official copy”. While they are a reasonable copy, they in no way, are official. Only Crosses made from the original dies and approved by the Queen, are allowed to be “specimens”, and are marked as such…..the last approved Cross was done in the 1950s. The dies now show stress cracks, so I can foresee no further approved specimens to be made. There are 12: one with the Royal Mint, the British Parliament Buildings, and others, including a pair made under direction of the Minister of Defence for New Zealand in 1914. One is in the Otago Museum in Dunedin, N.Z., and its twin is in my possession.

    The 1980s version has a crown of different shape. The “W” in “NEW” is of a different shape. The gold upper suspension ring on the 1982 piece is of a different size and shape. The French-made silk ribbon is too wide. The gold buckle on the 1982 version is superb, however. Being of 18ct gold and sterling silver, most other copies in circulation can’t compare to such expensive metals. Interesting that copies made around 1900 are quite good, and of better quality than the copies made today. Some of those were struck from the original dies, as the dies left the possession of Phillips when they ceased to exist around the turn of the 20th century. The dies are now housed with the N.Z. government, and will remain there.

    So…….long-winded explanation done……..today’s copies are either made in Australia, Germany, England, or an eastern European country. No doubt that the Chinese have, or will have, copies out there as well.

    My suggestion to a collector, is to buy either a very old copy, or the 1982 version. Both will set you back upwards of 1,000 pounds. My official specimen set me back 7,200 pounds.

    Cheers,

    Bill

     

Viewing 7 posts - 16 through 22 (of 22 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.