This topic contains 6 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Fredric Schneider 4 months, 3 weeks ago.

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #12230

    usmcgungho
    Member

    While observing some Chinese medals in the Mohler Collection at Stanford I noticed a certain similarity in the case design to current Japanese medals. This illustration is of the Yunan Province Commemorative Medal.
    YunanProvOMSA.jpg
    YunProv.jpg

    Attachments:
    You must be logged in to view attached files.
    #15351

    paul wood
    Participant

    If my memory serves me well some Chinese republican pieces were produced at the Japanese mint.

    Paul

    #15354

    usmcgungho
    Member

    Thanks Paul,
    I will start tracking them down and adding them as I spot them and we should be able to develop some corelation between the date of the medal and the date of the puppet government,
    Richard

    #15355

    usmcgungho
    Member

    Well I was wrong on that theory. It appears there is no corelation on the dates. At least during the non-occupation period.
    The following was exerpted from Wikipedia covering the puppet occupation periods:

    According to Wikipedia, a puppet state refers to a government controlled by the government of another country. This would include Manchukuo (1932-1945) as well as the Provisional Government of China December 14th, 1937-March 30th,1945 – Incorporated into the Nanjing Nationalist Government established in Nanjing by collaborationists. This puppet government led by Wang Jingwei was established in the Republic of China under the protection of the Empire of Japan. The regime officially called itself the Republic of China (中華民國, Zhōnghuá Mínguó) and its government the Reorganized National Government of China.[1] Informally it was known as the Wang Jingwei regime (Chinese: 汪精衛政權; pinyin: Wāng Jīngwèi Zhèngquán), the Nanjing Nationalist Government (Chinese: 南京國民政府; pinyin: Nánjīng Guó Mín Zhèngfǔ), the Republic of China-Nanjing, the Nanjing regime, or New China.
    The Reorganized National Government was one of several puppet states of the Japanese during the Second Sino-Japanese War (1937–1945), and it was meant to rival the legitimacy of the government of Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek, which was of the same name and based in Chongqing. Wang Jingwei was originally the leftist leader of a Kuomintang (KMT) faction called the Reorganizationists, who had broken away from Chiang Kai-Shek’s government in March 1940 and defected to the Japanese invaders.
    Claiming to be the rightful government of the Republic of China, it flew the same flag and displayed the same emblem as Chiang Kai-shek’s National Government, with an extra pennant demanded by the Japanese. However, it was widely regarded as a puppet state and enjoyed no diplomatic recognition, except from the states of the Anti-Comintern Pact.
    The Nanjing Nationalist Government was nominally a reintegration of several entities that Japan had established in northern and central China, including the Reformed Government of the Republic of China of eastern China, the Provisional Government of the Republic of China of northern China, and the Mengjiang government in Inner Mongolia, though in reality northern China and Inner Mongolia stayed relatively free of its influence.
    Officially the Reformed State was founded on 30 March 1940 and Wang Jingwei became head of state with Japanese support. It declared war on the Allies on 9 January 1943.

    #15356

    paul wood
    Participant

    According to a collector of Chinese awards the plain-backed early striped Tigers were manufactured by the Osaka mint.

    Paul

    #15357

    usmcgungho
    Member

    Department of Transportation Merit Medal circa 1927
    B17~1016G.jpg

    Attachments:
    You must be logged in to view attached files.
    #37659

    Fredric Schneider
    Participant

    During the Republic Period, 1911-23, Chinese medals were produced in Japan for the Chinese government.  They were made by individual Japanese medal makers who also produced medals for the Japanese government as well as for the Japanese “puppet states”.  I do not think (at the moment I am not absolutely certain) the Chinese medals were made by the Osaka Mint itself.  I have been told, but have seen no documentary evidence, that the Chinese government also used French enamelers to make some medals.  As I understand it, there was no history of medal making in China prior to the 1911 Republic, thus the use of foreign medal makers at the beginning.  Similarly, until 1867 there had been no history of medal making in Japan.

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.