Figure 1: Silver Civil Merit Medal, Images courtesy of Dorotheum.

 

Introduction:

In this blog I am going to discuss the Civil Merit Medal (Zivil-Verdienstmedaille) which was established by Emperor Karl I on April 30, 1918 to recognize extraordinary service in time of war or outstanding service in peace time by civil servants of all ranks or other civilians in support of the empire or the emperor. This is an unusual medal in that it was authorized late in the First World War and may or may not have ever been issued.

Date Issued: Emperor Karl created this medal on April 30, 1918

Reason Issued: To recognize extraordinary service in time of war or outstanding service in peace time by civil servants of all ranks  or other civilians in support of the empire or the emperor.

Classes or Types: There are two classes of this award:

  • Gold Civil Merit Medal
  • Silver Civil Merit Medal

Interesting Facts: These medals could be awarded retroactively

Hallmarks: None known

Design: A round medal with an attached wedge shaped suspension eye.

Figure 2: Gold Civil Merit Medal, obverse, Images courtesy of Dorotheum.

Obverse: The image of Emperor Karl in a Field Marshal’s uniform with decorations facing to the viewers left. Surrounding the image is the inscription: CAROLVS D G IMP AVST RX BOH ETC ET H N IV APOST HVNG.

Figure 3: Silver Civil Merit Medal, reverse, Images courtesy of Dorotheum.

Reverse:  A laurel bough on the viewers left and an oak bough on the right within which is the inscription SIGNVM LAVDIS (A token of esteem) in two lines.

Weight: Unknown

Size: 42 mm in diameter.

Type of Material: Siler gilt bronze and gold gilt bronze

Variations:  None known

Designer: Rudolf Marschall

Manufacturer: Hauptmunzamt Wien (Imperial Mint, Vienna)

Number Issued: It is reported that five medals were awarded but the veracity of this report is in question.

Case: Unknown

Ribbon: A 38-40 mm tri-fold ribbon.  The ribbon is red with a white center stripe.

  • A small rectangular ribbon conforming to the standards introduced in October 27, 1917.

Attachments: Multiple award bars were authorized for this medal

Miniature: None known to exist

Figure 4: Geza Nagy Freiherr von Tobor-Ethe, Hofsekretar and Kabinetts-Konzipist, 1914 Hofrat and Kabinettssekretar of the Emperor, from 1905 King of Arms of the Order of St Stephen wearing the Civil Merit Medal. Image from the author’s archive.

Hope you enjoyed this blog. Until next time, I hope you find joy in our shared interest.

Rick

 

Please follow and like us:
2 Comments
  1. I have learned a new word. What to hell is a Kabinett-Konzipist?
    Is the big chain on his coat a award?
    regards Andreas

    • Andreas

      To the best of my knowledge Konzipist is a professional title which was primarily used in Austria and Austro-Hungary to designate an individual who was responsible to assign research projects to others. in this context I think the position involved assigning information gathering and research projects to staff in areas of interest to the cabinet and then aggregating and presenting their findings as a basis for cabinet consideration and decision making. I know it is arcane but that seems to be the most reasonable interpretation of the title.

      Rick

      Rick

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.