A very small detail overlooked in literature regarding the Bavarian Bravery Medal Kinast Type 2 coinages is the die mark found on the lower reverse of the medal (Types 2a and 2b).  This die mark is a what appears to possibly be a letter “P” next to the numeral “1”.  This “P 1” mark that can be seen on the lower reverse of the Bavarian Bravery Medal to left of the shield on the “shelf” that supports the shield and the lion.  This marking has been observed on Kinast Type 2a silver medals, and Kinast Type 2b silver and gold medals.  It is also found on the silver-gilt “gold” medals that were struck utilizing the Type 2b reverse die.  The purpose of this mark is unknown.  What is certain is that it was a mark intentionally made on the die by the die-sinker.

 

 

 

Kinast Type 2a Reverse (Silver):

 

 

 

Figure 1: Reverse of an example of a Kinast Type 2a Silver Bavarian Bravery Medal. Image from the author’s archive.

 

 

 

Figure 2: Closer detail of the reverse of an example of a Kinast Type 2a Silver Bavarian Bravery Medal. Image from the author’s archive.

 

 

 

Figure 3: Die marking detail on the reverse of an example of a Kinast Type 2a Silver Bavarian Bravery Medal . Image from the author’s archive.

 

 

 

Kinast Type 2b Reverse (Silver):

 

 

 

Figure 4: Reverse of an example of a Kinast Type 2b Silver Bavarian Bravery Medal. Image from the author’s archive.

 

 

 

Figure 5: Closer detail of the reverse of an example of a Kinast Type 2b Silver Bavarian Bravery Medal. Image from the author’s archive.

 

 

 

Figure 6: Die marking detail on the reverse of an example of a Kinast Type 2b Silver Bavarian Bravery Medal . Image from the author’s archive.

 

 

 

Kinast Type 2b Reverse (Gold):

 

 

 

Figure 7: Reverse of an example of a Kinast Type 2b Gold Bavarian Bravery Medal. Image from the author’s archive.

 

 

 

Figure 8: Closer detail of the reverse of an example of a Kinast Type 2b Gold Bavarian Bravery Medal. Image from the author’s archive.

 

 

 

Figure 9: Die marking detail on the reverse of an example of a Kinast Type 2b Gold Bavarian Bravery Medal . Image from the author’s archive.

 

 

 

Kinast Type 2b Reverse (Silver-Gilt):

 

 

 

Figure 10: Reverse of an example of a Kinast Type 2b “Gold” (Silver-Gilt) Bavarian Bravery Medal. Image from the author’s archive.

 

 

 

Figure 11: Closer detail of the reverse of an example of a Kinast Type 2b “Gold” (Silver-Gilt) Bavarian Bravery Medal. Image from the author’s archive.

 

 

 

Figure 12: Die marking detail on the reverse of an example of a Kinast Type 2b “Gold” (Silver-Gilt) Bavarian Bravery Medal . Image from the author’s archive.

 

 

 

Comparing the details regarding the die marks on the reverses of the medals featured above, it can be concluded that the same die was used to strike the reverses of all of the medals shown.  No Kinast Type 2a Gold medal was available for this study.  Therefore, no data is available regarding such pieces.  In summary, at least four (4) types of Bavarian Bravery Medals which were struck with the same reverse die are known to exist and may be encountered: Type 2a Silver, Type 2b Silver, Gold, and “Gold” (Silver-Gilt).  These medals all have the “P 1” reverse die mark.

In contrast, the reverse of the Kinast Type 2c Silver Bravery Medals were struck with a different die.  The reverse detail of these medals features a lion with a protruding tongue.  An inspection of Kinast Type 2c Silver Bravery medals reveals that the reverses are lacking in the “P 1” die mark.  Instead, there is an extremely faint mark that looks like the top of a “1” to the left of the shield on the “shelf” supporting the shield and lion.  However, this mark is so insignificant that it can be considered an anomaly and not an intentional mark.  It is believed that the Type 2c medals were distributed after the conclusion of the Great War and after the fall of the Bavarian Monarchy.  No Kinast Type 2c Gold medal was available for this study.  So no data is available regarding such pieces.

 

 

 

Kinast Type 2c Reverse (Silver):

 

 

 

Figure 13: Reverse of an example of a Kinast Type 2c Silver Bavarian Bravery Medal. Image from the author’s archive.

 

 

 

Figure 14: Closer detail of the reverse of an example of a Kinast Type 2c Silver Bavarian Bravery Medal. Image from the author’s archive.

 

 

 

Figure 15: Detail of the reverse of an example of a Kinast Type 2c Silver Bavarian Bravery Medal . Image from the author’s archive.

 

 

Thank you for your interest regarding this article.

Comments are welcome.

– Lorin

 

 

Literature:

  1. Kinast, Walter.  Die Prägevarianten der königlich-bayerischen Militär-Verdienst-Medaille im Vergleich.  Militaria & Phaleristik. Magazin für Sammler militärhistorischer-und zeitgeschichtlicher Antiquitäten. Nr. 1, Mai – August 2018. ISSN 2570 – 110X. Verlag Weber, Schönau.

 

The same article cited above may be also be found as a blog on the OMSA website:

  1.  https://www.omsa.org/die-pragevarianten-der-koniglich-bayerischen-militar-verdienst-medaille-im-vergleich/

 

 

5 Comments
  1. Servus Lorin,

    The new year starts with a very interesting contribution from you. Thank you for that. Congratulations on this very successful contribution about the P.1 characteristic for “Ries” medals of type 2. In general, the feature is known as P.1. However, on closer inspection, it is more likely that it is an E.1 for “Entwurf 1” (Design 1). What it really means has not yet been found out.

    The gold type 2a) medals were stamped with the same stamps as the silver medals, so that they have an identical reverse side as the Silver type 2a medals. A few years ago such a medal was shown at eMedals, but it is not listed in the eMedals archive. These gold medals of type 2a are extremely rare.

    Thank you for your very interesting articles about the Bavarian medals and decorations.

    Greetings from Bavaria

    Walter

    • Servus Walter,

      Thank you for your comments regarding my article and for your astute observation regarding the “mystery letter”. I agree with you that it is more likely to be a stylized “E”. The possibility that this stands for “Entwurf”(design) is intriguing. I find it curious that the die-sinker would leave this mark on a production die.

      Best regards,

      Lorin

  2. Servus Lorin,

    in this case, however, it cannot be said that it is really an E.1 or P.1. It can also be the remainder of another marking that was not completely removed at the end of the stamping process. However, as indicated above, for me it is a part of an “E” rather than a part of an “P”.

    I think that this question cannot be answered in the future either. The fact is, however, that this marking is present on types 2a and 2b.

    Best regards
    Walter

  3. Great article and pictures!

    • Hello Heinz,

      Welcome to the OMSA blog.

      Thank you for your supportive comment regarding my article. I am glad that this blog has attracted the attention of an expert such as you.

      With friendly greetings from the US to Bavaria,

      Lorin

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