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  • in reply to: Early OMSA membership medals? #35825

    jb floyd
    Moderator

    I joined around 1964 and I think I got mine from the Secretary, Jim Wilkinson, at about that time.  It only got used when I went to my first convention in 1972. It now has 45 convention bars attached.  I believe my medal is the first type, with the lapel device screwed through the center of the pendant.

    You might check with the OMSA Treasurer, Tim Bartholow, who has compiled reams of info on OMSA awards and may have some material on the membership medal as well.


    jb floyd
    Moderator

    I’ve had several requests for these medals, but they only place I see them is on Ebay.  None of the usual suspects for civilian agency awards has had any for several years now.

    in reply to: curious medal anyone any idea #32077

    jb floyd
    Moderator

    The General George A. Custer Commandery No.385, Knights of Malta, was located in Buffalo, New York. It appears to have been most active in the 1910-1915 period.  This would be a lodge membership badge.

    A number of fraternal organizations with Masonic connections use the “In Hoc Signo Vinces” [In this sign he conquers] motto.

    in reply to: mystery medal #32047

    jb floyd
    Moderator

    It’s a Knights Templar badge. The Custer name for the lodge would cause me to look at Michigan as a location.

    in reply to: CASED BRAZLIAN TABLE MEDAL #31897

    jb floyd
    Moderator

    The term “table medal” is most commonly used in the US in reference to a non-wearable medal (i.e., something that would be best displayed on a table). Table medals are certainly collectable, although there is generally more interest within the numismatic community than in the militaria community.

    in reply to: Is this a South American Medal? #31894

    jb floyd
    Moderator

    It’s nothing I recognize as being Latin American. While the ribbon colors can certainly point to Colombia or Ecuador, the ribbon also matches the US-based Military Order of Foreign Wars. However, the religious nature of the design would point me toward an organization rather than a governmental agency.

    in reply to: Info on Belgian medal of merit #31704

    jb floyd
    Moderator

    This design is commonly used by schools as rewards for merit. The design echoes the French Palmes Academiques, but it is not associated with that decoration. Over the years, I’ve found several in “bring-back” troves of veterans who served in France and Belgium.  They’re not government awards, but were available commercially.

    in reply to: OMSA CONVENTION PITTSBURGH 2016 #31504

    jb floyd
    Moderator

    It will be interesting to see what the Soldiers and Sailors Memorial brings out.  Thanks to Andreas for organizing their participation.

    For those who will be in Pittsburgh for the OMSA convention, or any other reason, the Soldiers and Sailors Memorial has an outstanding collection of medals, and is well worth a visit. They’re located in the Oakland section of town, right across the street from the main building of the University of Pittsburgh.

    in reply to: Burma? #31457

    jb floyd
    Moderator

    With the double eagle motif, I’d look in the recent Russian/formerly Russian arena.  I’m not sure the collecting community can keep up with the output from that part of the world.

    in reply to: What's your Holy Grail? #31325

    jb floyd
    Moderator

    Kevin,

    I’m looking for a group to an American who joined the British Army and rose to command at any level. I have a group to an American who commanded an RAF squadron, one who commanded a Fleet Arm Arm squadron and one who commanded a corvette.  The Americans who joined the RAF and RNVR are fairly well documented, but Americans who joined the British Army are not.

    I have a group to an American (USAAF officer) who was assigned to an RAF squadron and flew a full tour as a bomber pilot, but I don’t know if there were similar circumstances of American officer being assigned to the British Army.  The Neutrality Act problems of the time made it most convenient if Americans trying to join up classified themselves as Canadians or some other nationality. As a result, they are hard to find now.

    in reply to: What's your Holy Grail? #31215

    jb floyd
    Moderator

    A British Army medal group to an American who was in command of a British unit at some level during World War II.  I have similar groups to the Royal Air Force and Royal Navy, so an Army group would fill that empty square.

    in reply to: Please help with Japanese medal identification #31178

    jb floyd
    Moderator

    Frankly, this looks like one of the endless stream of fakes and fantasies that continue to pour out of China through Ebay.  Many incorporate elements of real orders and the multi-colored enamelled rays seem to be a particular favorite.  They may have graduated from the “hairpin” style of pins, but the absence of a polished back still points to a very modern origin.

    in reply to: Burma? #31096

    jb floyd
    Moderator

    Good catch!  Unfortunately, this piece now goes back into the unidentified pile.

    in reply to: Burma? #31092

    jb floyd
    Moderator

    This medal has been posted on another forum as possibly related to a state visit by Yugoslavia’s Marshal Tito to India and Burma in 1954.  The similarity in design to the Order of the Yugoslav Flag may indicate its original as Yugoslavian rather than Burmese.

    in reply to: An Unusual Badge #30523

    jb floyd
    Moderator

    I don’t think I’ve ever seen a fire fighters badge with an inscription relating to his military service.  A very interesting piece.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 361 total)

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