Unofficial medals

This topic contains 11 replies, has 2,602 voices, and was last updated by  christophe 5 years, 5 months ago.

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #11961

    christophe
    Member

    Unofficial medals of societies, associations…

    Please, post here about these medals.

    Ch.

    #13828

    Anonymous

    What the Cross?
    "Lintrarius socus"
    lintll9.jpg
    lintrom4jw4.jpg

    Attachments:
    You must be logged in to view attached files.
    #13829

    frivilig
    Participant

    Appears to be an amateur society medal, French in manufacture, in fact Ebay.fr featured a similar medal in the summer.

    Derived from the Latin lyntrarii. Now a lintarius is either a large flat-bottomed cargo riverboat (linter) or the boatman (lighter) who navigates the boat. A socus is a plowshare.

    I propose that perhaps it is a gentleman’s sport punting society? Given for repeatedly plowing one’s linter into river sandbanks?

    Bill

    #13830

    christophe
    Member

    Hi,

    This is a French associative medal (so, unofficial) awarded by the Associations des Passeurs Interalliés. I would translate this by Interallied Escape Agents Association (not sure of the exact translation though, but you got the idea, people who are frontier runners during conflicts).

    This is, IMHO, one of the most ugly medals I know…

    Cheers.

    Ch.

    #13831

    doc riley
    Member

    I need help identifying this Buttonhole medal on bow mount. I think that it is French.

    Doc
    BUTTONHOLE%20LYRE%20MEDAL%20REV.JPG
    BUTTONHOLE%20LYRE%20MEDAL%20OBV.JPG

    Attachments:
    You must be logged in to view attached files.
    #13832

    doc riley
    Member

    I’ve just had this confirmed as French. It is a medal for membership in a local civilian orchestra or band. Era: 1880-1950’s.

    Doc

    #13833

    frivilig
    Participant

    The harp as a generic medal motif appeared frequently here in the USA among immigrant sangerverein (German/Swiss/Austrian singing societies) and the like during the early twentieth century. I have a number of these, a few German, more for the American Union of Swedish Singers (which is still active after a century). If you obtained your piece in the States it could just as likely be for such a society member. Admittedly, the use of the Tri-Colour in this ribbon does strongly suggest a Franco origin.

    Bill

    #13834

    doc riley
    Member

    It came with a lot of French medals from an auction. I still feel that it’s French. Thanks for the information!!!

    Doc

    #13835

    Anonymous

    hi Riley1965,

    I confirm you that it is a civilian non official ‘medal’ for orchestra or band member, the ribbon (green with the blue-white-red stripe) is used in lot of non official civilian medal, concerning the period 1880-1930
    Regards
    Ludovic

    #13836

    doc riley
    Member

    Thanks for the confirmation of a Non-Official Band/Orchestra medal!!! It’s nice to know the time period.

    Doc

    #16023

    Anonymous

    I have a small (miniature?) medal that is of a silver color with a raised frontal picture of General Joffre. At the top it says "Pro Patria" and at the bottom "General Joffre". on the reverse side are two very small head and shoulder pictures of what appear to be women. Below that is the number 75 and a field artillery piece, and at the bottom, the date 1914-1915. There is a small red-white-blue striped ribbon tied to the hole at the top. It was among some other "commemorative" medals of my father who served in the U.S. Navy in both WWI and WW2, but I have no idea what the medal was for or how he happened to have it. Any info would be appreciated.

    #16028

    jb floyd
    Moderator

    There were hundreds of these small commemorative patriotic medals from the World War I era, often showing the famous generals of the day. The "French 75" was a mainstay of the French artillery (and today many are still displayed outside of American Legion posts and at WWI memorials in the US). These medals were usually sold to raise money for war relief and reconstruction. Because of their minimal cost, they were popular souvenirs among American GIs.

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Join OMSA

Join now to start taking advantage of the member benefits including the Journal of the Orders and Medals Society, Ribbon Bank, Library, Annual Conventions, Publication Program and much more!
Join Now!

Site Login