Order of the Legion of Honor / Ordre de la Légion d’Honneur

Orders & Medals Society of America Forums French Medal Collecting French Orders and Medals pre-1870 Order of the Legion of Honor / Ordre de la Légion d’Honneur

This topic contains 37 replies, has 10 voices, and was last updated by  peter clement 6 months, 2 weeks ago.

Viewing 8 posts - 31 through 38 (of 38 total)
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  • #14586

    Christophe
    Participant

    This first Legion of Honor is one of two that were picked up by a British Officer present at Waterloo. I need some help identifying the type. My first thought is it is a First Empire Type 2 Fifth Class (1806-1808) badge. It has a swiveling crown with twelve branches with oak leaves at the base of the crown. There appears to be no hallmark on the suspension ring. The obverse and reverse seem to be consistent with this type.(…)

    Hi Chris,

    I’m far from being an expert in Legion d’Honneur, specifically when they are from "troubled" periods, with models and types frequently changing… ;)

    First, I would like to congratulate you for these two outstanding awards !! :D They are "sublimissimes", and if you have the story that goes with them… :))

    Second, I agree with your identification. This is a "big head" First Empire Type 2.

    Cheers.

    Ch.

    #14587

    Christophe
    Participant

    Can anyone verify if my assumption is correct and add any other relevant comments? If I am correct, what are the differences between a First Empire Type 4 (1813-1815) and a 1815 Hundred Days type? Could there be a chance that it could be the Hundred Days type considering where it came from?

    Best Regards,
    Chris

    Hi again Chris,

    I also agree with your identification (First Empire Type 4 (1813-1815), but have a question : where (literature) can you find a specific 1815 Hundred Days type ? As far as I know, there are no official description of a new type made, and the knights just changed the centers (again), except for those who had got a 1st restauration period cross, with "Fleurs de lys".

    Cheers.

    Ch.

    #14599

    cecawthorne
    Moderator

    Hello Christophe,

    A long time ago, I got a data table from Virginia Medlen (our past OMSA General Counsel) listing the common distinguishing characteristics of the Crosses of the Legion Of Honor for all time periods. Virginia was one of a few experts on this order that I have come across in my collecting lifetime. In that table was listed a "Hundred Days" type that was classified as very rare. This table is the only reference I have to say it existed and is the basis for my comments in my previous post. Virginia passed away some time ago, so I can not follow this question up with her. Therefore, I can not be certain it did exist unless perhaps another reference source mentions it and can describe it as well. However, I would not be surprised if it did (modified or made new) due to the motivating power of the award that Napoleon would have used to push his men during the Hundred Days campaign.

    Best regards,
    Chris

    #14640

    Christophe
    Participant

    Hi Chris,

    Many thanks for your comment.
    As far as I know, the type used during the ‘100 Days" would be the 4th type with some variants… There are debates of experts on this, but am modestly unable to have a valuable and personal opinion…

    Let’s see what the others will say… ;)

    Cheers.

    Ch.

    #14671

    felix
    Member

    I’ve posted the pictures on a french forum.

    The first one is type 1 modified to a type 2 with a crown.
    The second one is apparently a "100 days" (according to the size, a reduction). It’s always hard to be 100% sure as they are very close to the Présidence (1851) type, but if it was taken in Waterloo, that’s a good one.

    #14677

    cecawthorne
    Moderator

    Hello Felix & Christophe,

    I appreciate your insights and help in getting these pieces identified. I am most pleased to hear about the 100 Days type confirmation since I do know where it came from. It was picked up by Lt. Basil Jackson of the Royal Staff Corps at or after Waterloo in 1815. Lt. Jackson went on to have more adventures on St. Helena as an engineer during Napoleon’s exile that is quite well documented.

    Best Regards,
    Chris

    #15592

    kjohn
    Member

    Chris,
    I am somewhat late to the discussion. What bothers me is that Emperor’s head is turned to the left where as most literature shows Emperor’s head turned to the right in all of the 1st Empire examples.
    I believe it may be a ‘transitional’ piece. I have seen couple of the ‘Biennais’ pieces with the head turned left but that was in the 1st type (of 1st Empire) and with very large head. Lovely cross in any case. Are there any punch marks on the suspension ring. Should have the ‘fascias’ mark to be of the 1st Empire period.
    KJ.

    #35499

    peter clement
    Participant

    Did Napolean give medals to civil officials and in particular to Pierre Clement du Lausatt, the last and only French Prefect Governor of the Lousiana Territory in 1803?

    He went on to serve in other countries after the French sold Louisiana to the United States.

Viewing 8 posts - 31 through 38 (of 38 total)

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