Noor’s Royal Dublin Fusiliers humble collection

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  • #14887

    noor
    Participant

    Thomas Roberts (1890 – 08.10.1918)
    Private
    Royal Dublin Fusiliers/ Wiltshire Regiment

    British War Medal named to “14357 Pte. T.Roberts R.DUB.FUS”

    He was entitled to:
    – 1914-15 Star (Roll B/4B Page 209)
    – Victory Medal (Roll B/101 B5 Page 350)
    – British War Medal (Roll B/101 B5 Page 350)

    Thomas Roberts was born in Shepton Mallett, Somerset on the 1890 as son of Charles and Mary Roberts. He had one sister Martha and two brothers Fred and Charles.
    Thomas was married to Elsie Roberts, of Trebanog, Rhondda, Wales (1/4).

    After the break out of the Great War on the 28th July 1914, many men enlisted to the Army for a war-time service only. Regarding Thomas first regimental number, it is impossible to say when exactly he entered for a service, but surely he was one of the many New Army recruits around end of 1914, early 1915.
    Private Roberts attested to the Wiltshire Regiment and his service number was 13022. He enlisted from Porth, Wales recruitment depot or via recruitment officer (3).
    After a short service with Wiltshire Regiment, he was transferred to the Royal Dublin Fusiliers, 6th (Service) Battalion what was part of 30th Brigade in 10th (Irish) Division. His new regimental number was 14357 (2/3).

    Private Roberts new Battalion set sail for Gallipoli, as part of the new Mediterranean Expeditionary Force under General Sir Ian Hamilton (9).
    6th Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers were embarked at Devonport on the 7am on Saturday 10th July 1915 (1) and sailed on the H.M.T. Alaunia, a ship commanded by Captain Sir Arthur Henry Rostron (7), who was in charge of the RMS Carpathia when she rescued Titanic survivors.
    As a part of the 10th (Irish) Division, Battalion were sent to Gallipoli via Mytilene where they took part Allies new attack against the Turkish troops on Suvla Bay what is 25 miles north of Cape Helles. (2/8/9).
    Private Roberts landed on Suvla Bay at 5 am on the 7th August 1915 (1/2). They experienced a very bitter action when the battalion moved forward to positions near Chocolate Hill, also because complications with the supplies as drinking water and ammunition.
    All together 569 Royal Dublin Fusiliers (as well 7th Battalion) lost their lives in Gallipoli, before the Allies withdrew from there in January 1916 (9).

    On the 29th September 1915 Lieutenant General Sir Bryan Mahon arranged to move the 10th (Irish) Division from Gallipoli. 91 officers and 2,363 other ranks, including the 6th and 7th Dublin Fusiliers, sailed to Salonika.
    The difficult weather and diseases caused many casualties. On the 3rd October 1915, the 6th Battalion RDF with other Divisions was at the front line and was ordered to take the village of Jenikoj. After short success, they took heavy casualties caused by their own artillery fire and Bulgarians counterattack. Also Conflicting orders made the situation more difficult and caused extra casualties. In the end 131 men from 6th Battalion were killed, wounded or missing (9).

    On the 9th September 1917, the 6th Battalion as a part of 10th Division were sent to Alexandria for service in Palestine (8/9). They arrived via Egypt in Ismalia on the 12th September 1917. Battalion was attached to the XX Army Corps, that was commanded by General Philip Chetwode (10). During this campaign, 6th Battalion engaged in Third Battle of Gaza (27th October – 7th November 1917) where the who 10th Division captured the Hareira Redoubt on the 7th November. Also they took part in the capture of Jerusalem and in defensive battles against Turkish counterattacks (9/10). All together these operations on the Holy Land were more successful then previous ones on 1915 and 1916.

    The next move took place on the 27th April 1918, when the Battalion was removed from 10th Irish Division and sent on the 3rd July 1918 to Taranto, Italy. From there battalion was transferred by train to France and on the 21st July 1918 attached to the 197th Brigade, 66th (2nd East Lancashire) Division.

    On the 10th September 1918 they transferred to the 198th Brigade in the same Division.

    It is impossible to say which battles and engagements Private Roberts took part. Regarding his MIC and 1914-1915 Star medal role, he surely landed on Sulva Bay on the 7th August 1915 as a soldier from 6th Battalion of Royal Dublin Fusiliers. He hasn’t been mentioned on the Irish Times, etc publication, so most likely he was lucky enough to not get wounded seriously during his service in Gallipoli and Balkans.

    Unfortunately his luck ran out exactly one month before Armistice with Germany when he got killed in action on the 8th October 1918 during the battle of Cambrai. At this point he held a rank Lance Corporal and he was 28 years old.

    He is buried on the Guizancourt Farm Cemetry, Gouy (Aisne), among with 150 comrades, who fell early October 1918.

    Sources:

    (1) Royal Dublin Fusiliers – a forgotten regiment
    http://www.dublin-fusiliers.com/battali … s-7th.html

    (2) British Army WWI Medal Rolls Index Cards, 1914-1920
    http://search.ancestry.co.uk

    (3) UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919
    http://search.ancestry.co.uk

    (4) 1891/1901 England Census
    http://search.ancestry.co.uk

    (5) Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC)
    http://www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_det … lty=588140

    (6) Army Service Numbers 1881-1918; Wilshire Regiment
    http://armyservicenumbers.blogspot.com/ … 20Regiment

    (7) Arthur Roston – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Rostron

    (8) Royal Dublin Fusiliers – A Long, Long Trail, The British Army of 1914-1918
    http://www.1914-1918.net/dubs.htm

    (9) Irish Battalions – RDF Major Battles
    http://www.greatwar.ie/ire_batmb.html

    (10) XX Corps (United Kingdom) – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_XX_Corps

    #14888

    noor
    Participant

    Thomas Roberts resting place in Aisne

    most likely Thomas fell during this attack what is shown on the scetch below (6th battalion war diary)

    #14953

    noor
    Participant

    Michael Killeen
    Private
    2nd Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers

    Michael Killeen was entitled:

    – Victory Medal (Roll B/101 B7 Page 553)
    – British War Medal (Roll B/101 B7 Page 553)
    – 1914-15 Star (Roll B/7B Page 195)

    Michael was born in Longwood, Co. Meath as a son of John and Mary Killeen on the 1877. After his childhood, Michael moved to Dublin and married with the Jane Killeen around 1899. They had four sons and three daughters. Michael worked as a Coal Labourer. And their family lived in 33 Constitution Hill, Arran Quay, Dublin (6/8).

    When the Great War broke out, new service battalions were called up next to the old regimental battalions. Also modern warfare gained heavy costs and fresh reinforcements were vital for bloody war in France and East.

    Because Royal Dublin Fusiliers continued with the old service number series, it is possible to indicate that Michael enlisted for service around second half of May 1915 (20095 enlisted 1st May 1915, 22290 enlisted 29th July 1915. His service number was 20230 (3/4).
    After initial training, he was posted to the France on the 14th December 1915, as reinforcement to the 2nd Battalion (nicknamed ‘The Old Toughs’) Royal Dublin Fusiliers, what was part of 10th Brigade in 4th Division (2/4/6). Because that move end of the year, Michael qualified as well for a 1914-15 Star (9).
    At this time Battalion have seen some of the bloodiest battles in France, including suffering 1915 summer serious gas attacks against their position. Because heavy losses, they didn’t took part any major battles in the end of 1915 (1/10).

    Coming year, Private Killeen took part the battle of Somme, what begun 1st July 1916. The opening day of the battle, British Army suffered the worst one-day combat losses in its history, with approx. 60,695 (19,240 KIA) (1/5/10).
    Private Killeen’s unit attacked in the second wave area near Hawthorne Redoubt what was just detonated using explosives in the tunnel but still 503 men who went into battle, 325 became casualties (10).

    Almost in the end of the battle, 2nd Battalion was located near Ginchy in October 1916.
    On the 23rd October men went over the top in four waves. Their objective was a German machine gun position known as Gun Pits with four machine guns. It was located east of village Lesboeufs (1/10).
    Under heavy machine gun fire, men managed to crawl into German trenches where horrific hand to hand fighting started. In the end, 2nd Battalion managed to take that ground. Also history for the whole Royal Dublin Fusiliers was made, Sgt. Robert Downie from B Company won in the Great War regiment first Victoria Cross (London Gazette 25th November 1916):
    For most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty in attack. When most of the officers had become casualties, this non-commissioned officer, utterly regardless of personal danger, moved about under heavy fire and reorganised the attack, which had been temporarily checked. At the critical moment he rushed forward alone, shouting, ‘Come on the Dubs’. This stirring appeal met with immediate response and the line rushed forward at his call. Sergeant Downie accounted for several of the enemy and in addition, captured a machine gun, killing the team.

    But the price was hard as well: 17 men got killed and 124 wounded, 36 men were missing (10).

    One of the soldiers, who became a casualty on that day, was Michael Killeen.
    Notification about his death was recorded on the Irish Times on the 27th November 1916 (11).
    He is buried in the Thiepval memorial (reference Pier and face 16 C) next to other 377 Royal Dublin Fusiliers soldiers, who found their final resting place in there. He was 39 years of age, when he got killed (1/6/7).

    Source:

    (1) Royal Dublin Fusiliers – a forgotten regiment
    http://www.dublin-fusiliers.com/

    (2) British Army WWI Medal Rolls Index Cards, 1914-1920
    http://search.ancestry.co.uk

    (3) Army Service Numbers 1881-1918
    http://armyservicenumbers.blogspot.com/

    (4) The Long, Long Trail – The British Army of 1914-1918 – for family historians
    http://www.1914-1918.net

    (5) Royal Dublin Fusiliers – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Dublin_Fusiliers

    (6) UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919
    http://search.ancestry.co.uk

    (7) Commonwealth War Graves Commission
    http://www.cwgc.org

    (8) National Archives: Census of Ireland 1901/1911
    http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie

    (9) British Campaign Medals, 1914-2005 (Shire Library)
    by Peter Duckers

    (10) Crown and Company, 1911-1912, 2nd Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers
    By Colonel H.C.Wylly, C.B.

    (11) The Irish Times, 27th November 1916

    #14985

    noor
    Participant

    James Fox
    Private/Corporal
    2nd Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers

    James was entitled to:

    Victory Medal (Roll 7B/101B Page 4)
    British War Medal (Roll 7B/101B Page 4)
    1914-15 Star (Roll B/6a Page A36)

    Regarding his service number 4780, James enlisted to the Dublin Royal Fusiliers around end of March 1893 (number 4761 joined in 2nd March 1893). He must be born at least 1875 (4).

    Unfortunately there isn’t any information about him online or other sources what I have and because his name is very common, it is impossible to find him on Census of Ireland without the extra details.

    Because he is not on the Queens South Africa and Kings South Africa medal roles, I presume that he was sent to reserve before Royal Dublin Fusiliers moved to the Boer War on the 10th November 1899.

    When the Great War broke out, the 2nd Battalion was in Gravesend, part of 10th Brigade in 4th Division, commanded by Brigadier-General J.A.L. Halden C.B., D.S.O.
    On the 4th August 1914, 5.5 p.m. the order to mobilization was published. At this time James was probably called back for service and quick training.
    Meantime 2nd Battalion was sent as a part of British Expeditionary Force (BEF) to France, where they embarked on the 22nd August on the “S.S. Caledonia” (2).

    Battalion found themselves in heavy battles immediately. They took part in the retreat following the Battle of Mons, taking part in their first engagement on 26th of August 1914 at Le Cateau that helped delay the German advance towards Paris, inflicting such heavy casualties that the Germans thought they faced more machine-guns than they actually did (2).
    But Battalion suffered many casualties and lots of them found themselves in the German hands and staid rest of the war in the POW camps mainly in Limburg.

    Private James Fox was sent to France as reinforcement and on the 27th November 1914 he entered to the theatre of war (3).

    He isn’t mentioned on the wounded lists at the Irish publications, most likely he was one of the lucky ones, who didn’t became a casualty during the war (wounded or killed).Also he haven’t been discharge during the war cause of his wounds, sickness or health problems.

    However, Medal Index Card also shows that during his service, he had been promoted to the rank Corporal.

    Sources:

    (1) The 2nd Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers in the South African War
    by Cecil Francis Romer and Arthur Edward Mainwaring

    (2) Crown and Company, 2nd Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers
    By H.C. Colonel Wylly

    (3) British Army WWI Medal Rolls Index Cards, 1914-1920
    http://search.ancestry.co.uk

    (4) Army Service Numbers 1881-1918
    http://armyservicenumbers.blogspot.com/

    #14986

    noor
    Participant

    Thomas J Hearne (1899 – xxxx)
    Private
    7th Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers

    Thomas J Hearne is entitled to:

    Victory Medal (Roll B/101 B12 Page 955)
    British War Medal (Roll B/101 B12 Page 955)
    Silver War Badge (B/1217)

    Thomas enlisted in the Royal Dublin Fusiliers on the 4th June 1917 and he was posted to the 7th Battalion as a private, his service number was 30199 (1/2/3). He was around 17 years old at this time.

    This battalion was formed as a part of K1 at the Curragh Camp and was attached to the 10th (Irish) Division (1/2/3/4/5/6/7). They first saw action in the bitter fighting at Gallipoli. From 1915 7th Battalion was sent with the Division to Salonika.

    Thomas’ Silver War Badge entry confirms, Private Hearne first saw action in the Balkans (area code “2A” from 1916), where he must of arrived before August 1917, because at this time 10th (Irish) Division, were ordered to concentrate in Salonika in preparation for moving from the Balkans. In September they arrived in Egypt and then commenced their participation in the Palestine campaign (6/8).
    Pte. Hearne most likely took part in the Third Battle of Gaza (27th October – 7th November 1917), and also in the capture of Jerusalem and later on the defense from Ottoman counter-attacks (4/5/6/8).
    In early 1918 Thomas’s unit mainly held the positions they had gained. In March 10th (Irish) Division attacked the enemy’s position in Jilijilia area which was a again success.

    In 1918 heavy losses taken during the German Spring Offensive in France on the Western Front required extra reinforcements. As a result, ten Battalions from 10th (Irish) Division were transferred to France, including 7th Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers. They left from Alexandria on the 23rd May 1918 on board the P&O ship Kaiser-I-Hind and arrived in Marseilles 1st June 1918.

    The battalion had a week to rest beside the sea at Rouxmensnil, near Dieppe. On the 6th June 1918 the Battalion was reduced to a cadre and the men were absorbed with the 2nd Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers. Four days later the cadre returned to England and was absorbed into 11th Royal Irish Fusiliers.
    11th Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers was reorganized and on the 28th June 1918 and moved to Aldershot, as a part of 48th Brigade in 16th (Irish) Division. In late July 1918 they landed again in France and in the coming month, on the 29th August, where absorbed with the 5th Battalion (2).

    These organisational changes probably didn’t affect Thomas Hearne’s service as during his period in the front line he was wounded and was probably sent back to home to recover. He was discharged on the 27th March 1919, based on King’s Regulation 392 (XV1) which meant that he was no longer physically fit for war service. At the time of his discharge, Thomas was 19 years and 10 months old (3).

    Unfortunately I am not able to locate him on any census listings. Due to this I do not have any information about his nationality and where he lived before his service or/and after.

    Sources:

    (1) British Army WWI Medal Rolls Index Cards, 1914-1920

    (2) The Long, Long Trail – The British Army of 1914-1918 – for family historians
    http://www.1914-1918.net

    (3) WO329, RDF, British Army Medal Roles, Infantry Record Office, Dublin

    (4) 10th (Irish) Division – Wikipedia, the free encyclopaedia
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/10th_(Irish)_Division

    (5) 10th (Irish) Division – The Long, Long Trail, 1914-1918
    http://www.1914-1918.net/10div.htm

    (6) 7th Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers
    http://www.dublin-fusiliers.com/battali … alion.html

    (7) Ireland and World War I – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ireland_and_World_War_I

    (8) Irish Battalions – RDF Major Battles
    http://www.greatwar.ie/ire_batmb.html

    #15000

    noor
    Participant

    James Dowling
    Private
    1st Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers

    Royal Dublin Fusiliers Service Number 8083
    Hampshire Regiment Service Number 11425

    James Dowling was entitled:

    Victory Medal (Roll B1/103 B33 Page 3221)
    British War Medal (Roll B1/103 B33 Page 3221)
    1914-15 Star (B/6 B Page 94)
    Silver War Badge (B/48)

    James enlisted to the Royal Dublin Fusiliers around end of 1902 or early 1903 (Service number 7999 joined on 9th October 1902 and 8823 joined on 15th September 1903). He served as a private and his service number was 8083 (1/2). At this time new recruits signed a contract for a period of 7 year’s full time service with the colours and another 5 on the National Reserve (3). He must have been at least 18 years old for a recruit (although he could not be sent overseas until he was aged 19) (3).

    Unfortunately there are many James Dowling’s on the 1901 Irish Census whose age would broadly fit, therefore it is at this point impossible to narrow him down without any extra information (4).

    Probably during this time he also served abroad if he was posted to the 1st Battalion which was based in Crete and Malta. From 1905 they were posted in Egypt and Sudan.
    2nd Battalion was in Buttevant, Cork after the Boer War. They left for Aldershot, England in 1910 and remained there until Great War begun in 1914 (6).

    After his full-time service with the colours, he was sent to the reserves around 1910.

    When the Great War broke out, reservists were called up for service in August and September 1914. One of them was certainly Private James Dowling.
    After retraining he was attached to the 1st Battalion what arrived to England from Fort St. George, Madras in August 1914 (3/5).
    Early 1915 they were attached to the 86th Brigade in 29th Division and were located in Nuneaton (3).

    On the 16th March they left from Avonmouth and embarked on the ship “Ausonia” to the port Mudros on the Aegean island of Lemnos. They arrived to there on the 9th April 1915 (3/5).

    After preparations, 29th Division had orders to land at the Dardanelles peninsula, at Cape Helles. It was very difficult choice because open beaches or cliffs what was relatively easy to defend by Turkish troops. Also naval artillery support wasn’t able to destroy Turkish positions before men moved in (5).
    Battalion start moving to their landing sector on the “SS River Clyde” night before 25th April 1915. Before they approached to the beach, their Brigade Commander told to the men; “Fusiliers, our brigade has the honour of the first to land.” (5).

    And as a part of very first men of landing, companies from 1st Battalion landed at “V” Beach on 25th April 1915 at 06:25. They suffered instantly heavy casualties, most of not even getting out of their boats (6).

    After few days serious fighting, British forces had been secured themselves on the peninsula but far from their objectives, continuously suffering casualties.

    Cost to 1st Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers was horrific: battalion was 901 men strong on the SS River Clyde and during the period of 25th April – 30th April they lost 163 men killed, 342 wounded and 21 men missing. Because Royal Munster Fusiliers suffered similar casualties, they were decided to amalgamate and called “Dubsters” for next month until replacements arrived (3/5/6).

    It is impossible to say when exactly Private James Dowling landed in Cape Helles because mistake on his medal card what gives Date of entry therein 16th April 1915. But surely he was there because his first theatre of war first served in is recorded Balkans (2B) what includes Gallipoli (1).

    Also The Irish Times from 7th June 1915 records him as a one of 43 1st Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers wounded in action (7).

    Probably after his recovery, he was transferred to the Hampshire Regiment as a private and his new Service Number was 11425.

    Again, there is no trace did he got wounded for a second time or previous wounds were the reason of that but James was honourably discharged from the Army on the 11th September 1916 and he received one of the first Silver War Badge, what was started to issue from the same month.

    Source:

    (1) British Army WWI Medal Rolls Index Cards, 1914-1920
    http://search.ancestry.co.uk

    (2) Army Service Numbers 1881-1918
    http://armyservicenumbers.blogspot.com/

    (3) The Long, Long Trail – The British Army of 1914-1918 – for family historians
    http://www.1914-1918.net

    (4) National Archives: Census of Ireland 1901/1911
    http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie

    (5) Royal Dublin Fusiliers – a forgotten regiment
    http://www.dublin-fusiliers.com

    (6) Royal Dublin Fusiliers – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Dublin_Fusiliers

    (7) The Irish Independent, 7th June 1915

    #14839

    noor
    Participant

    Francis O’Hara
    Private
    6th Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers

    Private O’Hara served with the following units:

    Royal Dublin Fusiliers 16561
    Royal Munster Fusiliers 1205
    Royal Dublin Fusiliers 16561
    Labour Corps 396174
    Royal Engineers WR/342371

    Victory Medal (Roll RE/104 B8 Page. 2273)
    British War Medal (Roll RE/104 B8 Page. 2273)

    Victory Medal named to “16581.PTE.F.O.HARA.R.D.FUS”

    Regarding his service number 16561, Francis enlisted for a service around November 1914 (service number 16339 enlisted 2nd November 1914 and service number 17664 enlisted 4th January 1915) (1).
    Medal role confirms that he was posted to the 6th (Service) Battalion, what was formed in Naas as part of K1 from August and was attached to the 30th Brigade in 10th (Irish) Division (5/6).
    Following year on the 11th July 1915 they embarked to the ship “Alaunia” and sailed to Gallipoli where they landed on the 7th August (2).

    However, Francis must be staid back at this time because his Medal Card confirms his entitlement as Victory Medal and British War Medal only. Others from the 6th Battalion became entitled for 1914-15 Star as well after the Suvla Bay landing.

    In the end of 1915 6th Battalion among with the 10th (Irish) Division was moved to the Salonika, where they saw some bitter action and also suffered many casualties because hard winter, hot summer, mosquitoes and disease.

    Because there isn’t any trace about Private Francis O’Hara’s service, it is impossible to narrow down what time he joined the battalion on the field but most likely it happened during this time in Balkans.

    Next move has to be taken place soon, when he was transferred to the Royal Munster Fusiliers. His new service number was 1205. After short service with “The Dirty Shirt” he was moved back to the Royal Dublin Fusiliers within his old service number.

    Next move took place when Francis was sent to the Labour Corps. His new service number was 396174 and he finished his service with the Royal Engineers Waterways and Railways unit (service number WR/342371).

    I wasn’t able to trace him via Census or other publications. It is impossible to say when the transfers took place and where he was at this time.

    Sources:

    (1) Royal Dublin Fusiliers – Ancestry.co.uk
    http://www.ancestry.co.uk

    (2) Royal Dublin Fusiliers – a forgotten regiment
    http://www.dublin-fusiliers.com

    (3) Royal Munster Fusiliers –
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Munster_Fusiliers

    (4) British Army WWI Medal Rolls Index Cards, 1914-1920

    (5) WO329, RDF, British Army Medal Roles, Infantry Record Office, Dublin

    (6) The Long, Long Trail – The British Army of 1914-1918 – for family historians
    http://www.1914-1918.net

    #15162

    noor
    Participant

    Bernard Clarke
    Private, 27083
    10 Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers

    Entitled:

    Victory medal (Roll A/101 B2 Page 318)
    British War medal (Roll A/101 B2 Page 318)

    Served:

    Royal Dublin Fusiliers 27083 – 10th
    Royal Munster Fusiliers 18244 – 2nd and 1st
    Royal Irish Regiment 41065 – Acting Corporal

    Bernard enlisted around late spring 1916 and he started his service with the 10th Battalion of Royal Dublin Fusiliers.
    At this time 10th Battalion stationed at the Royal Barracks, Dublin (now Collins barracks) (1/4).

    Most likely Bernard enlisted straight after Easter Rising in Dublin (24-30 April 1916) and received his initial training in Phoenix Park fields. On the August 1916 whole unit was sent to England for last preparations and already 19th August 1916 they all landed at Le Havre, where they became under command of 190th Brigade in 63rd (Royal Naval) Division (2).

    Because Private Bernard Clarke’s service papers don’t exist, it is impossible to find out when exactly he entered to the Theatre of War but most likely he was with the battalion from its first day in service abroad.

    After few months of acclimatisation, major event for the 10th Battalion became the Battle of the Ancre (13 – 18 November 1916), where they experienced worst casualties; 314 men died, 81 men alone on the 13th November 1916 (1/5).

    Next biggest engagement took place with the enemy on the attack at Gavrelle on the 15th April 1917, when the 10th Battalion lost 14 men killed.

    Most likely after some of these big engagements Private Clarke was transferred to the Royal Munster Fusiliers 2nd Battalion and later on to the 1st battalion. His new service number was at this time 18244.

    Next he was transferred again and this time to the Royal Irish Regiment. Also he was promoted to the rank Acting Corporal.

    Acting Corporal Bernard Clarke was sent to the Class “Z” Army Reserve 2nd October 1919 (6).

    Source:

    (1) Dublin Fusiliers 10th Battalion history
    http://www.dublin-fusiliers.com/battali … alion.html

    (2) The Long, Long Trail – The Royal Dublin Fusiliers
    http://www.corkrecords.com/WWIMemorial.htm

    (3) Family Tree, Genealogy and Census Records – Ancestry.co.uk
    http://www.ancestry.co.uk/

    (4) Collins Barracks – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Collins_Barracks_(Dublin)

    (5) Battle of the Ancre – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_the_Ancre

    (6) Royal Irish Regiment – Roll of Individuals entitle to the Victory Medal and/or British War Medal

    #15273

    noor
    Participant

    Next my Royal Dublin Fusiliers medal came to me as a disk only. At least I was able to fix it and the research about the owner shows one another sad story from the Great War.

    Charles Stevens (1889 – 23.10.1916)
    Private, 18250
    2nd Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers

    Medal entitlement of Charles Stevens:

    Victory Medal (Roll B/101 B6, Page 480)
    British War Medal (Roll B/101 B6, Page 480)
    1914 – 15 Star (Roll B17B, Page 332)

    Charles was born in Gateshead, Durham Scotland on the 1889. He was the son of Robert and Elizabeth Stevens. Before the war Charles lived in Dunfermline, Scotland. (5/6/7).

    After the war broke out, Charles enlisted as a Private in the town of Hamilton, around January 1915 and was assigned to the unit of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers (5).

    After his initial training, Charles was posted to the 2nd Battalion.
    This Batallion fought in France during the war and had suffered numerous casualties right up until the end.(1/2/8).
    Private Charles Stevens was recorded as first joining the theatre of war when he arrived in France on the 27th May 1915 (2).

    It is most likely he saw action from this time onwards and engaged in various battles on French soil. At this time the battalion was part of 10th Brigade, 4th Division and engaged in the last battles of 1915 where 2nd Battalion saw action during the Summer Operations of the – St.Julien-, Frezenberg- and the Bellewaerde battles.

    The following year, the main objectives for the unit were the battles of the Somme and the fields of Flanders, The dates of engagement for Pte. Steven’s unit were as follows :Battle of Guillemont (3-6 September 1916), Morval (25 – 28 September) and Transloy (1 October – 5 November) (1/3/4/8).

    During this period battalion suffered many casualties. Nearing the end of a long series of fighting, the unit engaged in one major battle commonly know as a Battle of Somme

    During this battle the unit planned a small attack on the 23rd October 1916 after dawn. Battalion marched to the assembly point at 4.10 p.m. & awaited further orders. After the mission objectives were identified to the troops & under own artillery forward barrage, they “went over the top” in four waves. No enemy fire was encountered until 10 yards of their own mark, know as the Gun Pits, and only then they came under heavy machine-gun and rifle fire. They managed to crawl forward and eventually broke enemy lines but not with out numerous casualty’s. In the end, the fighting was so close the troops were forced to engage in frantic hand-to-hand combat with one another.

    However, on this day the battalion paid the ultimate price & suffered the loss of a total of 3 officers, 14 non-commissioned officers. The unit also records that a further 36 non-commissioned officers and men were confirmed missing or assumed Killed in action.

    One of the soldiers missing was 27 year old, Private Charles Stevens. His Medal Index Card states –Confirmation of death 23.10.1916.His name is listed on the 27th November the Irish Times as missing in action and he is commemorated on the Ypres (Mening Gate) memorial.

    An interesting fact in relation to this battle is the mention of one of Charles comrades, Sergeant Robert Downie from B Company received a Victoria Cross for gallantry in action on the 23rd October. London Gazette (25th November 1916) states:

    “At the critical moment he rushed forward alone, shouting, “Come on, the Dubs!”

    Source:

    (1) Royal Dublin Fusiliers – a forgotten regiment
    http://www.dublin-fusiliers.com/

    (2) British Army WWI Medal Rolls Index Cards, 1914-1920
    http://search.ancestry.co.uk

    (3) The Long, Long Trail – The British Army of 1914-1918 – for family historians
    http://www.1914-1918.net

    (4) Royal Dublin Fusiliers – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Dublin_Fusiliers

    (5) UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919
    http://search.ancestry.co.uk

    (6) Commonwealth War Graves Commission
    http://www.cwgc.org

    (7) 1891 Census
    http://search.ancestry.co.uk

    (8) Crown and Company, 1911-1912, 2nd Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers
    By Colonel H.C.Wylly, C.B.

    (9) The Irish Times, 27th November 1916

    #15274

    noor
    Participant

    Research turned out almost nothing. Even I wasn’t able to confirm his battalion via medal role.

    Frederick G Stratton
    Private. Service number 29204
    Royal Dublin Fusiliers

    Regarding his service number, Frederick was listed with the Royal Dublin Fusiliers around end of 1916/early 1917. Service number 27459 joined 14th August 1916 (Derby) and number 29368 joined to the 11th Battalion 21st February 1917 (1/2).

    Unfortunately his Medal Index Card don’t show what time he entered to the Theatre of War but still provides his Great War awards entitlement and units where he served with (2).

    However, medal role shows that Private Stratton served with the Royal Engineer’s before the move to the Royal Dublin Fusiliers and his service number was at this time (T) 649. Most likely he didn’t serve abroad then.

    Then he was listed to the Training Reserve Battalion (service number 8421) after what he was moved to the Royal Dublin Fusiliers. It is impossible to say where, when and with what Battalion he saw action or even did he saw action at all with the Dubs. Although Private Stratton’s Victory Medal and British War medal are both impressed to the Royal Dublin Fusiliers.

    Like medal role confirms, he was moved back to the Royal Engineers with the service number 334503 in the end of the War and he served as a Sapper.

    I wasn’t able to locate him on the publications or census lists.

    Sources:

    (1) Royal Dublin Fusiliers – Ancestry.co.uk
    http://www.ancestry.co.uk

    (2) British Army WWI Medal Rolls Index Cards, 1914-1920

    (3) WO329, RDF, British Army Medal Roles, Infantry Record Office, Dublin

    (4) The Long, Long Trail – The British Army of 1914-1918 – for family historians
    http://www.1914-1918.net

    #15275

    noor
    Participant

    Killed few days before the end of the war.

    Lawrence O’Neill (1883-1918)
    Private, 29036
    2nd Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers

    Lawrence O’Neill was entitled:

    Victory Medal (Roll B/101. B11 Page 912)
    British War medal (Roll B/101. B11 Page 912)

    Lawrence was born in Islington, Middlesex at 1883. He lived in Islington whole his life and he was married with the Alice O’Neill.

    When the Great War broke out, Lawrence enlisted to the Queen’s (West Surrey) Regiment from Whitehall, Middlesex and his service number was 37596 (1).
    Probably after short period of time and initial training, he was sent to the Royal Dublin Fusiliers as a reinforcement. His new service number was 29036. Regarding his service number, this move took place most likely around November-December 1916 (2). Book “Crown and Company” mention a new draft of 300 soldiers, who arrived at this time to the 2nd Battalion (4).

    During this time 2nd Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers was transferred to the 48th Brigade in 16th (Irish) Division on the 16th November 1916 (3). End of the year 2nd Battalion strength was 32 officers and 957 non-commissioned officers and men (4).

    Most likely at this time he saw action in Western front, when 2nd Battalion took part battles of Messines and third Ypres, gaining heavy casualties.

    Because Royal Dublin Fusiliers lost were high, in 1918 February 200 men from 8th and 9th battalions were absorbed with the 2nd battalion.

    Next 2nd Battalion took hard hit during German Spring Offensive (The Kaiserchlacht), what began 21st March 1918. 1st June cadre was transferred to 94th Brigade in 31st Division and middle of June transferred to Lines of Communications. In July attached to the 149th Brigade in 50th (Northumbrian) Division (2).

    In the end of the war, 2nd Battalion was near Mormal Forest what XIIIth Corps planned to attack with the three divisions. One of them was as well 50th Division.

    During the attack on the 4th November at 6.15 a.m. 2nd Battalion were in brigade reserve and moved forward from Fontaine-au-Bois 730 meters in rear of the attacking battalions, coming almost at once under a heavy barrage fire. During this day the Battalion lost 1 officer and 10 men killed.

    One of them was also Private Lawrence O’Neill, when he found his ultimate faith just 7 days before end of the Great War. Also this was the last action in which the 2nd Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers took part in its history (4).
    Lawrence was 35 years old at this time. His last resting place is in Cross Roads Cemetery, Frontaine-Au-Bois. Grave Reference I. A. 34.

    Most likely he was English born Irish because he is printed on the Irish casualties during the Great War list.

    Sources:

    (1) British Army WWI Medal Rolls Index Cards, 1914-1920

    (2) Family Tree, Genealogy and Census Records – Ancestry.co.uk
    http://www.ancestry.co.uk/

    (3) The Long, Long Trail – The British Army of 1914-1918 – for family historians
    http://www.1914-1918.net

    (4) “Crown and Company” 1911-1922, 2nd Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers
    Colonel H.C.Wylly, C.B.

    #15276

    noor
    Participant

    Dublin man who was gassed most likely…

    Patrick Griffin (xxxx – 27.04.1916)
    Private, 14521
    8th Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers

    Patrick was entitled:

    Victory Medal (Roll B/101 B5 Page 354)
    British War Medal (Roll B/101 B5 Page 354)
    1914-15 Star (Roll B6B Page 147)

    Like Ireland Casualties list of World War I and The Irish Times confirm, Patrick born and lived in Dublin. Unfortunately it is impossible to narrow him down yet on the Irish Census (5/8).

    When the Great War broke out, new service battalions were raised next to the regular two Royal Dublin Fusiliers units and man signed up for three years war service or the duration of the war (whichever was the longer) (3).
    One of these new units was 8th (Service) Battalion, (nickname “shining eight”).

    Battalion was formed in September 1914 and was attached to the 48th Brigade in 16th (Irish) Division (3). Regarding Patrick’s service number – 14521, he enlisted around 18-26 September 1914 from Dublin recruitment depot or via recruitment officer in Dublin.

    Battalion was sent to the Buttevant and later on next year to the Ballyhooley for initial training. In September 1915 they left for a final three months of training at Blackdown near Aldershot in Surrey. (1/3).
    Training wasn’t accurate; it mainly consisted of route marching and limited target practice. On the 2nd of December, the whole 16th Division was inspected by Queen Mary.
    On the 18th of December 1915, the 16th (Irish) Division was sent to France. As well Private Patrick Griffin landed in there on the 20th December 1915 (2/7).

    Beginning of 1916 they spent “Acclimatizing” men for the trauma of trench warfare behind main front line (7).
    Their first sector became muddy trenches around Hulluch near the French village of Loos (7).

    But the storm was on the way – German launched Battle of Hulluck (27-29 April 1916) hit the whole Irish Division hardly and they suffered massive casualties (7).
    Lots of them by German gas attack, when they released 3,800 cylinders of gas along a 3 km front.
    Hulluch was one of the most heavily-concentrated gas attacks of the war. 16th (Irish) Division suffered 2,128 Irish causalities; approx. 538 were killed. Many of the survivors suffered chronic lung and breathing conditions for the rest of their lives and many died years later as a result of this attack.

    The Chaplain to the Dublin Fusiliers described the scenes after the attack in a letter home to his father:


    One of the soldiers who lost his life during this attack was as well Private Patrick Griffin from 8th Battalion (5/6/8) who was announced Killed in Action on the 27th April 1916. His body never identified and he is commemorated on the Loos memorial, Panel 127 to 129 next to other over 20,000 officers and men who have no known grave and who are commemorated in this memorial. However, book “Ireland’s unknown soldiers The 16th (Irish) Division in the Great War” states that 60 men from 8th Battalion were buried in one shell hole. He could be one of them who final resting place is with his brothers in arms.

    Regarding his last will, his property and effects went to his aunt Mrs M A Harris, 12 Christchurch Place, Dublin, Ireland

    His name was also published on the 22nd May 1916 Irish Times (8).

    Source:

    (1) Royal Dublin Fusiliers – a forgotten regiment
    http://www.dublin-fusiliers.com/

    (2) British Army WWI Medal Rolls Index Cards, 1914-1920
    http://search.ancestry.co.uk

    (3) The Long, Long Trail – The British Army of 1914-1918 – for family historians
    http://www.1914-1918.net

    (4) Royal Dublin Fusiliers – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Dublin_Fusiliers

    (5) UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919
    http://search.ancestry.co.uk

    (6) Commonwealth War Graves Commission
    http://www.cwgc.org

    (7) Ireland Unknown Soldiers, The 16th (Irish) Division in the Great War
    by Terence Denman

    (8) The Irish Times, 22nd May 1916

    (9) Royal Dublin Fusiliers Association
    http://www.greatwar.ie/

    (ROI Roll of Honour is just a decoration there without any connection with the medal)

    #15281

    Frank Dutil
    Participant

    Humble collection indeed… :roll:

    You’d make more than a few collectors and even some museum curators blush with envy!

    #15302

    noor
    Participant

    Eh Frank… these are only VMs and BWMs and to be honest, I haven’t seen even a single MID set for RDF on sale. Looks like I picked up hard to find regiment to collect :? . But to me is the story behind them more important then the award. I have discovered the joy of research British awards fully this year and I really like it!

    James Logan (1896 – 27.10.1915)
    Private, 19866
    1st Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers

    Medal entitlement of James Logan:

    Victory Medal
    British War Medal
    1914-15 Star

    James was born in Paisley, Renfrewshire on the 1896 as a son of Thomas and Elizabeth Logan. He had 6 brothers and sisters. They lived in 4 Cochran Street, Paisley (5/6/7).

    When the Great War broke out, James enlisted on the April 1915 from Paisley to the Royal Dublin Fusiliers. His service number was 19866 and he served as a Private (2).

    When the initial training was completed, he was posted immediately to the unit, what suffered high casualties during the ongoing operations in Dardanelles – 1st Battalion of Royal Dublin Fusiliers, known as well “The Blue Caps” what was part of 86th Brigade in 29th Division (1/2/3/4).

    Private Logan arrived to the Cape Helles at the 2nd August 1915. It was one of the bloodiest battle zones in earth at this time. To support Suvla bay landing, 86th Brigade launched attacks against Turkish positions between 6th – 8th August and the “Blue Caps” alone lost 3 officers, 25 men killed, 150 wounded and 30 missing in action. By the end of evacuation, 1012 men, who went to Dardanelles in April and all the reinforcements what was sent in, 830 Dubliners lost their lives (1/3/4/8).

    It is sure James saw some horrific action and hard conditions in the Gallipoli. Unfortunately about 3 months after arriving, he got fatally wounded and died in the 89 (1st Highland) Field Ambulance on the 27th October 1915 age 19 (5/6/10).
    Major George Davidson, who was Royal Army Medical Corps officer in the 89th Field Ambulance, mention on his book “The Incomparable 29th and the “River Clyde” that on the 27th October mid day Turkish artillery opened sudden fire against the Anzac trenches from the extreme right to the extreme left. They expected first assault all along their lines but in less than 15 minutes it was all over. But this artillery attack caught many men in the open, sitting smoking on their parapets and such like, and 100 or 200 may have been knocked out (9).

    James Logan is buried in Azmak Cemetery, Suvla next to other 28 men from Royal Dublin Fusiliers (6/8).

    Source:

    (1) Royal Dublin Fusiliers – a forgotten regiment
    http://www.dublin-fusiliers.com/

    (2) British Army WWI Medal Rolls Index Cards, 1914-1920
    http://search.ancestry.co.uk

    (3) The Long, Long Trail – The British Army of 1914-1918 – for family historians
    http://www.1914-1918.net

    (4) Royal Dublin Fusiliers – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Dublin_Fusiliers

    (5) UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919
    http://search.ancestry.co.uk

    (6) Commonwealth War Graves Commission
    http://www.cwgc.org

    (7) 1891 Census
    http://search.ancestry.co.uk

    (8) A Brief History of “The Blue Caps”. The 1st Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers 1914-1922
    Patrick Hogarty

    (9) The Incomparable 29th and the “River Clyde”
    By George Davidson M.A., M.D., MAJOR, R.A.M.C.

    (10) The National Archives of Scotland – SC70/8/176
    http://www.nas.gov.uk/

    #15386

    noor
    Participant

    Peter Bradley
    Private, 31644
    1st Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers

    Peter was entitled:

    Victory Medal (Roll B/101 312 Page 980)
    British War Medal (Roll B/101 312 Page 980)

    There is 40 same names in Census of Ireland 1911 and because that, impossible to narrow down him this way (1).

    Peter enlisted with the Royal Dublin Fusiliers during the second half of the war. Probably between end of 1916 – early 1917. He served as a Private and his service number was 31644 (2/5).

    Most likely he received his initial training with the 4th Reserve Battalion and was posted out to the 1st Battalion, what fought at this time in France and Flanders as a part of 48th Brigade in 16th (Irish) Division (2/3/4).
    During 1918 this Royal Dublin Fusiliers unit took part some of the biggest engagements as a German Spring Offensive in March and suffered there heavy casualties. As a result of that, the 2nd Battalion was amalgamated which was reduced to cadre (3/4).
    Later on, on the 26th April 1918 1st Battalion was transferred to 86th Brigade in 29th Division (3/4).

    There are no notes about him on the materials what I have; also his service papers didn’t survived. Because that it is impossible to narrow down when Peter saw action but surely because his medal entitlements, it is possible to say that he served overseas and because he was listed as a soldier of 1st Battalion, he most likely saw action in France during 1918.

    After the war, 1st Battalion stationed in United Kingdom; Ponteland, Northumberalnd on the 1919 and during 1920 in Bordon, Hampshire (4).
    Probably he was one of the many soldiers, who were sent to Army Reserve after the war ended and got back in home around 1919.

    Sources:

    (1) National Archives: Census of Ireland 1901/1911
    http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie

    (2) British Army 1914-1918 Medal Index Card

    (3) The Long, Long Trail – The British Army of 1914-1918 – for family historians
    http://www.1914-1918.net/

    (4) Royal Dublin Fusiliers – a forgotten regiment
    http://www.dublin-fusiliers.com/

    (5) Victory Medal and British War Medal roll, Dublin Infantry Records, B408

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