Noor’s Royal Dublin Fusiliers humble collection

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  • #12081

    noor
    Participant

    Hi all,

    I would like to share some of my Royal Dublin Fusiliers medals and researches what I have done. If someone has something to add, correct or advise, please feel free to post it up ;)

    One another interesting set (unfortunately 1914 Star) is missing :cry: .

    William Devlin (1878 – 3rd July 1916)
    Private
    2nd Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers

    William Devlin was entitled:

    – Victory Medal (Roll B/103 B2 Page 106)
    – British War Medal (Roll B/103 B2 Page 106)
    -14 Star (Roll 132/Page 39)

    William Devlin was born in 1878 and grew up in Dublin. Unfortunately it is impossible to find information about him on the Ireland Census 1901.

    After his early life in Dublin, William enlisted to the army at the age of 25 on the spring 1903 (No. 7999 joined on 9th October 1902 and 8823 joined on 15th September 1903) as a private. His service number was 8635 (3).
    He most likely enlisted for 7 years full time service with the colours, to be followed by another 5 on the National Reserve. He was posted to the Royal Dublin Fusiliers 2nd Battalion, which returned to Dublin from the South African War the same year (9).
    After the Boer war, the battalion was based in Buttevant, Co.Cork until 1910, when they were moved to Aldershot, where the Battalion received its new Colours from the Regiment’s Colonel-in-Chief the Duke of Connaught at Aldershot (5/9). Probably at this point William’s 7 years of service was up and he was sent back to the National Reserve.

    Regarding Census of Ireland 1911, William married with the Ellin Devlin around 1907 and they had three children; Esther, Elizabeth and William. At this time William worked as a General Labourer and they lived Stephen Street (Royal Exchange), Dublin 2 (11).

    Also regarding the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website indicates that his contact person during his service was his nephew Christina Doran of 48 South Great George Street (7).

    When the Great War broke out, the 2nd Battalion was in Gravesend, part of 10th Brigade in 4th Division, commanded by Brigadier-General J.A.L. Halden C.B., D.S.O.
    On the 4th August 1914, 5.5 p.m. the order to mobilization was published. On the 8th of August at 12:30 a.m. the unit was moved to Harrow, where the whole Division was concentrated (10).

    After a short period of preparations, the division was attached to the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) and on the 20th of August orders were announced that Saturday 22nd Division will be departed. On that day 2nd Battalion was embarked on the S.S. Caledonia” and 11:30 a.m. start sailing to France (10).

    Private Devlin landed in France 23rd August 1914 where the whole battalion found themselves in heavy battles almost immediately.
    They took part in the retreat following the Battle of Mons, taking part in their first engagement on 26th of August 1914 at Le Cateau that helped delay the German advance towards Paris, inflicting such heavy casualties that the Germans thought they faced more machine-guns than they actually did. But many men, including men from the 2nd Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers, were stranded behind German lines, and many were taken prisoner by the Germans (5).

    Probably at this time, Private William Devlin became a POW.
    He was held in Limburg POW camp in Hesse.
    At the early start of the war some of Irish the POW’s was separated into a camp at Limburg where they were visited by Sir Roger Casement, who was trying to raise an "Irish Brigade" with almost no luck. Out of 2,200 Irish soldiers who were moved to Limburg, Casement managed to recruit only 55 (9/10).

    On the 10th July 1916 British authorities were informed by American Ambassador that one of the British POWs was shot in the Limburg camp.
    Incorrectly they stated that this person was William Devlin from Royal Munster Fusiliers but sadly the wrong part was only the unit, where William served with the Royal Dublin Fusiliers.

    On July 13 the Foreign Office addressed a strong protest to the German Government against their action in endeavoring to place obstacles in the way of Mr. Gerard inquiring into the shooting of Moran (another Irish soldier who was shot), and in concealing the death of Devlin. An extract from the protest was as follows
    ”We demanded an immediate inquiry, in the presence of a member of the United States Embassy at Berlin, into the shooting of the two prisoners and the punishment of those found guilty. We pointed out that the proceeding would be all the more infamous if it was found to be connected with the refusal of the men to join Casement, and we asked leave from the American Government to publish the correspondence”.
    The Germans trial found out that the guard Gefreiter (Corporal) Wust at Kordof shot William Devlin on the 2nd July 1916 as a self defense, after 2 warning shots. Devlin died next day on the 3rd July 3:30 to his fatal wounds. No future action was taking against Gefreiter (Corporal) Wust (1).
    William’s death is confirmed on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission site, Ancestry website and also Irish casualty listings (6/7).
    William is buried Cologne Southern Cemetery, Grave XIV.D.5. He was 38 years old (7).

    Source:

    (1) Royal Dublin Fusiliers – a forgotten regiment
    http://www.dublin-fusiliers.com/

    (2) British Army WWI Medal Rolls Index Cards, 1914-1920
    http://search.ancestry.co.uk

    (3) Army Service Numbers 1881-1918
    http://armyservicenumbers.blogspot.com/

    (4) The Long, Long Trail – The British Army of 1914-1918 – for family historians
    http://www.1914-1918.net

    (5) Royal Dublin Fusiliers – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Dublin_Fusiliers

    (6) UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919
    http://search.ancestry.co.uk

    (7) Commonwealth War Graves Commission
    http://www.cwgc.org

    (8) The Irish in Uniform – Royal Dublin Fusiliers
    http://homepage.eircom.net/~tipperaryfame/rodubfus.htm

    (9) Irish Prisoners of War in WW1
    http://www.irishbrigade.eu/camps/limburg.html

    (10) Crown and Company, 2nd Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers

    (11) National Archive: Census of Ireland 1911
    http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie

    #14850

    noor
    Participant

    articles:

    #14851

    noor
    Participant

    Photos:

    Picture from The War Graves Photographic Project (http://twgpp.org/)

    #14852

    noor
    Participant

    John Kelly (1900 – 22.08.1918)
    Private, 20815
    2nd Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers
    7th (SIH) Battalion, Royal Irish Regiment

    John Kelly full entitlement:

    Victory Medal (Roll A/131 B7 Page 1127)
    British War Medal (Roll A/131 B7 Page 1127)

    John was born in 1900 as a third child of Hugh and Elizabeth Kelly in Wolstanton,
    Burslem, Staffs. They lived nearby in 6 Grant Street, Cobridge, Stoke-on-Trent (4/5/7).

    When the Great War stared, Royal Dublin Fusiliers formed new service battalions what continued with the same service number series what was in use before the war. Because that, it is possible to confirm that John enlisted in May 1915 from Hanley Recruiting depot or via recruiting officer and he start his service with the Royal Dublin Fusiliers as a Private and his service number was 20815 (1/2). He must be only 16 years old at this time.

    After his initial training, in 1916 Private John Kelly was posted to the 2nd Battalion what was from 15th November 1916 part of 48th Brigade, 16th (Irish) Division (1/3/8).

    It is impossible to say which battles John took part and when his next transfer took place but as his Medal Index Card, Victory medal/British War Medal role states, he was posted to the 7th (South Irish Horse) Battalion, Royal Irish Regiment and his new regimental number was 26476 (1).

    However, as 7th (SIH) Battalion War Diary from 1918 states, that they received reinforcement after horrific casualties in March when the battalion was caught in the maelstrom of the German Kaiserschlacht (Kaiser’s Battle) offensive. Extra men from Royal Dublin Fusiliers and Royal Munster Fusiliers arrived on the 1st May and 26th June and they were formed into the Battalion in Widdebroucq area, near Aire during July. Most likely Private Kelly was one of these reinforcements (9).

    On the end of July Battalion had strength 31 officers and 830 other ranks and ready for action. At this time they were part of the 49th Brigade, 16th (Irish) Division (6). On the 7th August they were moved into front line.
    Looks like at then luck turned back to John. On the 19th and 20th August Battalion Diary indicates 2 wounded and on Boeschepe area and on the 23rd August 4 men killed and 3 wounded (9).

    Private John Kelly most likely was one of these wounded and he was transported to 62nd (1/2nd London) Clearing Station where he died of wounds on the 22nd August 1918. He was only 18 years old (4/5).
    He is buried Arneke British Cemetery in France, Grave Reference III.E.11 next to other 568 identified casualties (5).

    Source:

    (1) British Army WWI Medal Rolls Index Cards, 1914-1920
    http://search.ancestry.co.uk

    (2) Army Service Numbers 1881-1918
    http://armyservicenumbers.blogspot.com/

    (3) The Long, Long Trail – The British Army of 1914-1918 – for family historians
    http://www.1914-1918.net

    (4) UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919
    http://search.ancestry.co.uk

    (5) Commonwealth War Graves Commission
    http://www.cwgc.org

    (6) Ireland Unknown Soldiers, The 16th (Irish) Division in the Great War
    by Terence Denman

    (7) England Census 1901
    http://search.ancestry.co.uk

    (8) British Campaign Medals, 1914-2005 (Shire Library)
    by Peter Duckers

    (9) War diaries for 7th South Irish Horse Battalion, Royal Irish Regiment
    http://www.southirishhorse.com/document … _table.htm

    #14853

    noor
    Participant

    Picture from The War Graves Photographic Project (http://twgpp.org/)

    #14854

    noor
    Participant

    Thomas Hargroves (1886- 1918)
    Corporal

    ● Royal Dublin Fusiliers
    ● Royal Irish Regiment

    Victory Medal named to “ 25923 CPL T.HARGROVES R. D. FUS.”

    Royal Dublin Fusiliers regimental number 25923
    Royal Irish Regiment regimental number 18254

    Thomas Hargroves Medal Index Card provides his first service number as 25923 with the Royal Dublin Fusiliers and second regimental number after transfer to the Royal Irish Regiment (regimental number 18254). His only entitlements listed on the card:

    – Victory Medal (Roll 17/10/B6 Page 906).
    – British War Medal (Roll 17/10/B6 Page 906)

    Thomas Hargroves was born in Cappoley, Kilcolmanbane, Queen’s County (now County Laois) as a son of John and Lizzie on the 1886. Their family listed their trade as farmers.
    He also had two younger brothers William and John and three younger sisters – Lizzie, Ellen Jane and Mary Anne. They were all Roman Catholic’s.
    After finishing school, some time before 1911 Thomas moved to Cork and worked in the Prison Service as a Warden in Prison. He was not married at this time (4).

    After the war broke out a New Army (often referred to as Kitchener’s Army) battalions where put together in Ireland, where each man would sign up for new "general service" terms of three years or the duration of the war (whichever was the longer) and would agree to serving anywhere the army needed them.

    Thomas Hargroves enlisted to 10th battalion at the Royal Dublin Fusiliers from Cork recruitment depot (regimental number 25923) after 11th February 1916, when the 10th Battalion (The “Commercial” Pals) was formed in Dublin (8/10).
    By the time the battalion was formed, they were only around 600 men. The Battalion was split into 4 companies, A, B, C, and D and they were first located at Royal Barracks (now Collins Barracks) gathering recruits and starting to train the men.
    Easter Rising – Monday 24th April
    The rebellion started at noon on Monday 24th April. In Royal Barracks when the fighting started on Monday 24th April. The DMP phoned the Military HQ at Parkgate at 12.10 to say that the Castle was under attack by armed Sinn Feiners. Col Cowan then ordered men from Royal, Richmond and Portobello Barracks to march to the relief of the Castle.
    The 10th Battalion of the Royal Dublin Fusilers was training at the Royal barracks on the Quays. Around noon rifle shots were heard from the city, and on hearing the bugle alarm call, orders were given for troops to be equipped and armed. A party of men from A Company were marched out of the barracks first, following men from B Company, in order to secure positions in the Dublin city.
    During the Easter Rising 10th Battalion casualties was as follows: 2 officers killed and 6 wounded, plus 9 Other Ranks killed and 28 wounded.
    After those tragic events in Dublin, his battalion was moved to England in August 1916 and was surprisingly attached to the 190th Brigade under Brigadier General W.C.G.Heneker in 63rd (Royal Naval) Division. 19th August 1916 they landed in Le Havre.
    They got their first combat experience in the Battle of the Ancre (Launched on 13 November 1916) where they attacked with 24 officers and 469 other ranks, 241 men became casualties.
    The next large assault what they took part was the assault on Gavrelle Village on the April 1917.
    The War Diary of the 10th Royal Dublin Fusiliers for April 1917 records that the battalion left its billets in Magnicourt in buses at 10am on the morning of 14th April, arriving at Arras at 3.30pm. And then marched on to St Catherine, moving up to the trenches at 6pm, in the "Balleul Gavrelle Sector".
    The village of Gavrelle was held by the German 66th Württenburger Fusiliers and was attacked on the 15th April. This attack by the 10th Battalion RDF was unsuccessful suffering casualties of 5 Officers and 80 other ranks. They were relieved in the front trenches by the 4th Bedfords at 6am on the 16th April, and withdrew to the reserve trenches.
    They suffered heavy shelling whilst in the Blue, Green and Brown line trenches over the next few days with 2 officers plus 5 other ranks killed on 21st April and a further 12 other ranks killed or wounded on 22nd April. The 10th Battalion was in reserve during the main attack on 23rd and 24th April and did not feature in this fighting.
    Next big change to the Battalion took place on the 23rd June 1917, when they were moved to 48th Brigade in 16th (Irish) Division (9).
    As a part of the Irish Division, 10th Battalion saw action in the battle of Cambrai 20th November 1917, where the 16th Division, attacking on a three-brigade front, was assigned the task of capturing a 2,000 yard section of the trench network. On the right flank of the Irishmen, 3rd Division’s 9th Brigade was detailed to capture an additional 800 yards.
    In the centre, 10th and 2nd Royal Dublin Fusiliers headed the attack of the 48th Brigade. The advance here was so rapid that the Irish found many Germans still wearing gas masks and unable to fight. 10th Dublin Fusiliers captured 170 Germans alone (10).
    It is impossible to narrow down, when private Thomas Hargroves got promoted to the rank Corporal or when exactly his transfer to the Royal Irish Regiment took place.
    Maybe when the Royal Dublin Fusiliers 10th Battalion was absorbed with the 8th/9th Battalions and finally disbanded in France on the 15th February 1918.
    He was transferred to Royal Irish Regiment, 2nd Battalion and his new regimental number was 18254. Most likely this happened when the 10th Battalion was dispanded. At this time the Royal Irish Regiment 2nd Battalion was part of the 49th Brigade, 16th (Irish) Division but was transferred to the 188th Brigade, 63rd (Royal Naval) Division on the 23rd April 1918.
    Almost at the end of his war, on the Battle of Albert (21st – 23rd August 1918), a phase of the Second Battles of the Somme, Corporal Thomas Hargroves met his ultimate fate and became one of the many Irish casualties who was Killed in Action at 21st August 1918.
    His memorial reference is listed on the Vis-En-Artois Memorial, Panel 5. He was 32 years old. Also Thomas Hargroves is commemorated in a St. Fin Barre’s Cathedral in Co. Cork (12).

    Source:

    (1) The Commonwealth War Graves Commission
    http://www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_det … ty=1743323

    (2) The Long, Long Trail – The Royal Irish Regiment
    http://www.1914-1918.net/rireg.htm

    (3) The Long, Long Trail – The Royal Dublin Fusiliers
    http://www.corkrecords.com/WWIMemorial.htm

    (4) National Archives: Census of Ireland 1901/1911
    http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/p … y/1648989/

    (5) Family Tree, Genealogy and Census Records – Ancestry.co.uk
    http://www.ancestry.co.uk/

    (6) Ireland and World War I – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ireland_and_World_War_I

    (7) The Long, Long Trail, 1914-1918
    http://www.1914-1918.net/kitcheners.htm

    (8) Dublin Fusiliers 10th Battalion history
    http://www.dublin-fusiliers.com/battali … alion.html

    (9) The Irish Brigades, 1685-2006, David Murphy
    A Gazetteer of Irish military service, past and present

    (10) Ireland Unknown Soldiers, Terence Denman
    The 16th (Irish) Division in the Great War

    (11) The British Infantry 1660 – 1945, Frederick Myatt
    The Evolution of a fighting force

    (12) Irish War Memorials
    http://www.irishwarmemorials.ie/html/pl … p?show=250

    #14855

    noor
    Participant

    Vis-En-Artois Memorial

    #14861

    Frank Dutil
    Participant

    Absolutely superb researched sets! Congrats and thanks for sharing! 8-)

    #14874

    noor
    Participant

    Thanks Frank! And again – some of these text contains English grammar mistakes but I try my best! :D

    William Joseph Dodds (1899-xxxx)
    Private
    11th Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers

    Royal Dublin Fusiliers 30413
    Army Service Corps M/332797

    He was entitled to:

    Victory Medal (RASC/101. Roll 230 Page 23657)
    British War Medal (RASC/101. Roll 230 Page 23657)
    Silver War Badge (RASC/4474)

    William was born in 1886 in Belfast to an Irish family. He married Alice Rose and they had two children William and Samuel. During this time he worked as a general laborer and Dodds’ family lived at 3 Dunlops Place, Cromac, Co.Antrim (7).

    When war broke out, William enlisted under the Derby scheme on the 5th December 1915 and he was called up next summer, when he started his service with the 11th (Reserve) Battalion of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers which was formed in Dublin in July 1916 (5/7).

    The battalion was absorbed with the 3rd (Reserve) Battalion in May 1918 which was located at Grimbsy as a part of Humber Garrison (4).

    Private Dodds next transfer took place on the 4th October 1918 and he was transferred to the Army Service Corps Mechanical Transport unit (3/5). His new service number was M/332797.

    William was discharged from the service due to sickness (Kings Regulations 392/ XVI – No longer physically fit for war service.) on the 17th May 1919 and he was granted the Silver War Badge, number B318513 (6).

    It is impossible to say when William served overseas and which theater of war. Medal roles do not show him serving with the other Royal Dublin Fusiliers battalion. However, his Victory Medal and British War medal are named to the Royal Dublin Fusiliers.

    Source:

    (1) Royal Dublin Fusiliers – a forgotten regiment
    http://www.dublin-fusiliers.com/battali … s-7th.html

    (2) British Army WWI Medal Rolls Index Cards, 1914-1920
    http://search.ancestry.co.uk

    (3) World War 1 medal abbreviations
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_ … reviations

    (4) The Long, Long Trail – The British Army of 1914-1918 – for family historians
    http://www.1914-1918.net

    (5) Victoy Medal and British War Medal roll – R.A.S.C.

    (6) Silver War Badge roll – R.A.S.C.

    (7) Ireland Census 1911
    http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie

    #14875

    noor
    Participant

    George Robinson (xxxx – 17.10.1918)
    Private
    2nd/6th Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers

    Regarding Medal Index Card, he was entitled:

    – 1914-15 Star (R.Dub.Fus. Roll B/7B Page 310)
    – British War Medal (Roll B/101 B2 Page 84)
    – Victory Medal (Roll B/101 B2 Page 84)

    According to an Ancestry notification and an Irish Independent article, George Robinson was born and raised in Dublin (2/8). Unfortunately there are four George Robinson’s from Dublin on the 1901 Irish Census whose age would broadly fit, therefore it is at this point impossible to narrow him down without any extra information.

    His service number confirms that George enlisted as a private around 1903 in the Royal Dublin Fusiliers (number 7999 joined on 9th October 1902 and number 8823 joined on 15th September 1903) for a period of 7 year’s full time service with the colours and another 5 on the National Reserve. His regimental number was 8226 (1/3/8).
    Probably during this time he also served abroad if he was posted to the 1st Battalion which was based in Crete and Malta. From 1906 they were posted in Egypt. 2nd Battalion was in Buttevant, Cork after the Boer War. They left for Aldershot, England in 1910 and remained there until Great War begun in 1914 (7).

    After his full-time service with the colours, he was sent to the reserves around 1910.

    When the Great War broke out, reservists were called up for service in August and September 1914. It was most likely that one of those called up was George Robinson. After retraining and completing musketry courses in the Royal Dublin Fusiliers depot in Naas at the end of 1914 and first part of 1915, he was attached to the 2nd Battalion (nicknamed ‘The Old Toughs’), Royal Dublin Fusiliers (10). Private Robinson landed in France on 13th July 1915 (1).
    At this time his battalion was part of 10th Brigade in 4th Division and was positioned around the town of Le Cateau (5). The 2nd Battalion took heavy casualties previously on the 24th may 1915 during battle of Ypres. The Germans launched a heavy bombardment and the first large scale gas attack against their position at 2:45. By 9:30 the battalion had lost 645 men out of 666, of whom 149 were listed as dead. One of the reasons for the high number of casualties was that they didn’t have any defences against the gas attack (5).
    George served in France and Flanders until the summer of 1916. On the 29th July 1916 the Irish Independent notes that Private Robinson got wounded in action (9). Most likely he was sent back home to recover.
    When he became fit again for frontline service, George was posted to the 6th Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers (10). At the end of 1916 and early1917 this unit was part of 30th Brigade in 10th (Irish) Division and served in Salonika and from September 1917 was moved to Egypt for service in Palestine (2).
    It is impossible to say from what moment Private Robinson was attached to this unit and if he saw any action with the Mediterranean Expeditionary Forces.
    On the 27th April 1918 the 6th Battalion left from the 10th (Irish) Division. They sailed to Taranto, Italy from where they were moved to France by train and attached to the 197th Brigade in 66th (2nd East Lancashire) Division on the 21st July 1918 (2).
    On the 10th September 1917 the Battalion was transferred to 198th Brigade in same the Division.

    Private George Robinson met his ultimate faith on the first day of the Battle of Selle, a phase of the Final Advance in Picardy (17th – 20th October 1918) (4/6/8). He was killed in action on the 17th October 1918. In the same operation, 57 men of the Battalion were killed, 325 men were wounded and 16 men missing in action (11).

    George Robinson is buried in Le Cateau Military Cemetery, Northern France, grave V.F.11 next to 511 other war casualties (8/12).

    Sources:

    (1) British Army WWI Medal Rolls Index Cards, 1914-1920
    http://search.ancestry.co.uk

    (2) The Long, Long Trail – The British Army of 1914-1918 – for family historians
    http://www.1914-1918.net

    (3) British Army service numbers
    http://armyservicenumbers.blogspot.com

    (4) Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC)
    http://www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_det … lty=595092

    (5) Royal Dublin Fusiliers – a Forgotten Regiment
    http://www.dublin-fusiliers.com/

    (6) History of the Great War – Principal Events Timeline – 1918
    http://www.greatwar.co.uk/timeline/ww1- … tm#october

    (7) Royal Dublin Fusiliers – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Dublin_Fusiliers

    (8) UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919
    http://search.ancestry.co.uk

    (9) Irish Independent, Saturday, July 29, 1916

    (10) BWM and VM Medal Role – Infantry Record Office, Island Bridge, Dublin

    (11) 6th Royal Dublin Fusiliers War Diary – October 1918

    (12) Cemfranord
    http://www.inmemories.com/Cemeteries/lecateaumil.htm

    #14882

    noor
    Participant

    Thomas Murray
    Private
    7th (Service) Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers

    Regimental number 15876

    Regarding Medal Index Card, Private Murray was entitled to:

    – 1914-15 Star (B/7B Page 243)
    – British War Medal (B/101 B5 Page 398)
    – Victory Medal (B/101 B5 Page 398)

    Regarding Thomas’ service number and his unit, Thomas Murray enlisted to the army as a New Army recruit around second half of October 1914.
    When the Royal Dublin Fusiliers formed new service battalions, they continued with the same numbering series that was in use for the regular 1st and 2nd Battalion. Number 15075 joined on the 1st October and 16339 joined 2nd November 1914 (11/13).

    After Minister for War, Field Marshal Earl Kitchener called up on 5th August 1914 a New Army then as a part of K1, 7th Royal Dublin Fusiliers, was formed. Each man signed up for new "general service" terms of three years or the duration of the war (whichever the longer) and would agree to being sent to serve anywhere the army needed them (2/4).

    The 7th Battalion was formed in August 1914 and was stationed first at the Curragh. On the 2nd February 1915 they moved to the Royal (now Collins) Barracks in Dublin. Battalion trained in trench warfare in the Phoenix Park and musketry training at Dollymount beach (2/7/11).

    Private Murray unit were attached to the 30th Brigade in 10th (Irish) Division and moved to Basingstoke, Hampshire on the 1st May 1915 from Dublin. Next three months whole Division underwent training until 27th June 1915, when they were ready for action (7/11).

    Thomas and his battalion embarked on the HMT Alaunia at Devonport at about 7am on Saturday 10th July 1915 and sailed to Gallipoli as part of the new Mediterranean Expeditionary Force. H.M.T. Alaunia Captain was Captain Rostron (Royal Naval Reserve). He had been the Captain of the “Carpathia” when it picked up survivors of the Titanic disaster in 1912 (12).

    On the way they moral was high, also they had stops in Gibraltar, Malta and Alexandria. 24th July they arrived in Mudros Bay on island of Lemnos where they saw Red Cross boats from Dardanelles full of wounded – hint of what was to come. Next day soldiers arrived Mitylene (2/9).

    6th August battalion was boarded on H.M.T. Fauvette for landing in Suvla Bay, where they arrived 4am following morning, under Colonel Geoffrey Downing command.
    Problems started because lack of organization; units were without the maps and orders, drinking water ran short and some moment they ran out of ammunition. But men fought well and in the first day battalion captured Chocolate Hill (called after "Dublin Hill"), what they occupied 8th – 12th August. Following battle for Kizlar Dagh on the 13th – 15th August, until withdrawal 29th September (9).
    However, Thomas wasn’t with others on the first day of landing. His Medal Index Card shows that he entered to the theater of war two days later on the 9th August as a reinforcement (1). I located another soldier from 7th Battalion with the same entering date; D Company (Dublin Pals), Pte. Cecil William Murray, 14125 who got killed in action on the 16th August 1915 (13). 7th Battalion D Company paid terrible cost in Gallipoli: of its 239 men who landed, only 79 remained after 8 weeks (9).

    All together 569 Royal Dublin Fusiliers (6th and 7th Battalion) lost their lives in Gallipoli, before the Allies withdrew from there (12).

    On 30th September battalion left from Gallipoli on SS ‘Abbasieh’ to Mudros and from there on Tuesday the 5th October, battalion embarked on the transport vessel H.M.T. Aeneas to Salonika, where they arrived 11th October 1915 (9/12).
    After reorganization and rest in the camp, they sent to the Serbian mountains to try to stop Bulgarian advance. Thomas and his unit relieved the French in the Hasanti-Gojceli-Bala-Causli line (9).
    Situation in there was very hard to the men again. Whole 7th Battalion was still dressed in shorts with pith helmets without any winter clothing. Meantime the weather was very cold and lots of men suffered frostbites, dysentery and malaria (9).
    In November 10th (Irish) Division hold the front line between Kosturino and Lake Doiran.

    On the 2nd October 1916, the strength of the 7th Battalion was 28 officers and 741 other ranks (12).
    In 3rd October 1916 the Dublin Fusiliers took part in the capture of the village of Jenikoi where they suffered heavy casualties, because as well friendly fire from their own artillery. 7th Battalion lost there 128 men killed, wounded or missing in action (12).

    Following year, in August 1917 the 7th Battalion, along with the rest of the 10th (Irish) Division, were ordered to concentrate in Salonika in preparation for moving from the Balkans. In September they arrived in Egypt and then commenced their participation in the Palestine campaign.
    The campaign was better success then the previous campaigns. Battalion took part in the Third Battle of Gaza (27th October – 7th November 1917). Also the capture of Jerusalem and later on defense from Ottoman counter-attack (9/12).
    Early 1918 Thomas unit they mainly held their gained positions. In March 10th (Irish) Division attacked enemy position in Jilijilia area what was again success.

    Meantime Germans launched their Spring Offencive in Western Front what gained many casualties in Allies side. Because that, ten Battalions from 10th (Irish) Division were moved to France, including 7th Battalion Royal Dublin Fusilisers. They leave from Alexandria on the 23rd May 1918 on board the P&O ship Kaiser-I-Hind and arriving in Marseilles 1st June 1918 .

    Battalion got a week next to the sea at Rouxmensnil, near Dieppe to rest and on the 6th June 1918 the Battalion was reduced to a cadre and men absorbed with the 2nd Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers. Four days later the cadre returned to England and was absorbed into 11th Royal Irish Fusiliers.
    11th Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers was reorganized and on the 28th June 1918 moved to Akdershot, as a part of 48th Brigade in 16th (Irish) Division. Late in July 1918 they landed again in France and already coming month, on the 29th August, absorbed with the 5th Battalion (2).

    Private Thomas Murray was sent to Army Reserve “Z” after 1918 December, what means that he returned to civilian life but with an obligation to return if called upon. The “Z” Reserve was abolished on 31 March 1920 (1/3).

    There aren’t many notes available about him but because he was sent to Army Reserve “Z”, it is possible to guess that he first at all survived the war and came out of it good enough shape for a future service, if necessary.

    Sources:

    (1) British Army WWI Medal Rolls Index Cards, 1914-1920

    (2) The Long, Long Trail – The British Army of 1914-1918 – for family historians
    http://www.1914-1918.net

    (3) WO329, RDF, British Army Medal Roles, Infantry Record Office, Dublin

    (4) Kitchener’s Army – Wikipedia, the free encyclopaedia
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kitchener's_Army

    (5) 10th (Irish) Division – Wikipedia, the free encyclopaedia
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/10th_(Irish)_Division

    (6) 10th (Irish) Division – The Long, Long Trail, 1914-1918
    http://www.1914-1918.net/10div.htm

    (7) 7th Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers
    http://www.dublin-fusiliers.com/battali … alion.html

    (8) Ireland and World War I – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ireland_and_World_War_I

    (9) Irish Battalions – RDF Major Battles
    http://www.greatwar.ie/ire_batmb.html

    (10) Family Tree, Genealogy and Census Records – Ancestry.co.uk
    http://www.ancestry.co.uk/

    (11) The Pals at Suvla Bay
    By Henry Hanna, K.C.

    looking suspension to fix it ( :? )

    #14883

    noor
    Participant

    Wilson Baggaley (1875 – 1942)
    Private
    9th Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers

    Royal Dublin Fusiliers 40785
    Labour Corps 409245
    Lancashire Fusiliers 60789

    Private Wilson Baggaley was entitled:

    Victory Medal (Roll H/1/101/B29 Page 5930)
    British War Medal (Roll H/1/101/B29 Page 5930)

    Wilson was born in Calver parish in Derbyshire on 1874 as a son of Joseph and Fanny Baggaley (2). They lived in Newburgh Terrace, Calver (2).

    He entered to the service most likely under Derby scheme and was mobilized around winter/spring 1916 (regimental number 40422 – joined on January 1916). He was listed with the Royal Dublin Fusiliers 9th Battalion as a Private and was sent to France some moment in late 1916 (as reinforcement after Battalion lost 66 men killed in the attack on Ginchy) or early 1917 (3/4/5).

    Most likely Wilson saw some action at this time, because 9th Battalion engaged in Battle of Messines and the Flanders Offensive (3rd Battle of Ypres) from 7th June – 10th November 1917 as a part of 48th Brigade, 16th (Irish) Division, where Division suffered over 4,200 casualties (3/4/5).

    Maybe because of his age or he got wounded in action, he was transferred to the Labour Corps 882nd or 883rd Company (probably 882) around October 1917. His new service number was 409245. These two companies were for Garrison Guard duties (1). These were armed companies used to guard and escort POWs and storage depots.
    In April 1918 882nd Company became part of 4th Provisional Guards Battalion in France. On the 25th May this Battalion was redesigned as the Lancashire Fusiliers 23rd Garrison Battalion (3). Because this move, Wilson received a new service number again, what were 60789 until he was demobilized (1).
    Regarding England & Wales, Death Index, Wilson died during Second World War at 1942. He lived at this time in the small market down Bakewell, Derbyshire and he was 68 years of age.

    Source:

    (1) British Army WWI Medal Rolls Index Cards, 1914-1920

    (2) Family Tree, Genealogy and Census Records – Ancestry.co.uk
    http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/

    (3) The Long, Long Trail – The British Army of 1914-1918 – for family historians
    http://www.1914-1918.net/

    (4) 9th Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers
    http://www.dublin-fusiliers.com/battali … alion.html

    (5) 16th (Irish) Division – Wikipedia, the free encyclopaedia
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/16th_(Irish)_Division

    (6) England & Wales, Death Index: 1916-2005
    http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/

    (7) Military Labour during the First World War
    http://www.labourcorps.co.uk

    #14884

    noor
    Participant

    William Whitehouse
    Private, 24349
    7th Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers

    William Whitehouse was entitled:

    Victory Medal (Roll B/101 B9 Page 712)
    British War Medal (Roll B/101 B9 Page 712)
    1914-15 Star (Roll B/10B Page 419)

    Unfortunately it is impossible to trace William on the Census records but there is a small chance that he was a Cork man.

    He enlisted around end of September/early October 1915 as a private (23948 joined in 17th September and 24557 joined in 11th November 1915) (1/8).
    After only a month training, Private Whitehouse found himself already in Egypt, where he landed at 20th November 1915. Because that, he was entitled as well 1914-15 Star, what was issued to the soldiers in the British Expeditionary Force who served in any theatre of the War on the 5th August 1914 to 31st December 1915 (1/3/9).

    Probably Private William Whitehouse was one of the many raw reinforcements, what was sent in after Gallipoli, where all together 569 Royal Dublin Fusiliers (6th and 7th Battalion) lost their lives (9). What made the situation even harder was the lack of supplies; as an example, 7th Battalion was still dressed in the shorts without any winter clothing. As a result, many men suffered frostbites, dysentery (6/9).

    When William entered to the front line in 20th November 1915, 7th Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers was part of 30th Brigade, 10th (Irish) Division and they were on the front line between Kosturino and Lake Doiran.

    Following year they have many engagements with the Bulgarian army, however, during the summer their main enemy was mosquitoes and malaria (6).
    On the 3rd October, during the “Struma Offensive”, 7th and 6th Battalions Royal Dublin Fusiliers captured village of Jenikoi but it was costly to the unit with the total of 128 men killed, wounded or missing (4/5/6).

    Following year, in August 1917 the 7th Battalion, along with the rest of the 10th (Irish) Division, were ordered to concentrate in Salonika in preparation for moving from the Balkans. In September they arrived in Egypt and then commenced their participation in the Palestine campaign.
    The campaign was better success then the previous campaigns. Battalion took part in the Third Battle of Gaza (27th October – 7th November 1917). Also the capture of Jerusalem and later on defense from Ottoman counter-attack (4/5/9/12).
    Early 1918 Thomas unit they mainly held their gained positions. In March 10th (Irish) Division attacked enemy position in Jilijilia area what was again success.

    Because heavy casualties in the Western Front in Spring 1918, ten battalions from 10th (Irish) Division were moved to France, including 7th Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers. They leave from Alexandria on the 23rd May 1918 on board the P&O ship Kaiser-I-Hind and arriving in Marseilles 1st June 1918 (2/4/5/6).

    Battalion got a week next to the sea at Rouxmensnil, near Dieppe to rest and on the 6th June 1918 the Battalion was reduced to a cadre and men absorbed with the 2nd Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers. Four days later the soldiers returned to England and were absorbed into 11th Royal Irish Fusiliers.
    11th Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers was reorganized and on the 28th June 1918 moved to Akdershot, as a part of 48th Brigade in 16th (Irish) Division. Late in July 1918 they landed again in France and already coming month, on the 29th August, absorbed with the 5th Battalion (2).

    Private William Whitehouse was sent to Army Reserve “Z” after 1918 December, what means that he returned to civilian life but with an obligation to return if called upon. The “Z” Reserve was abolished on 31st March 1920 (1/2/3).

    There aren’t many notes available about him but because he was sent to Army Reserve “Z”, it is possible to guess that he first at all survived the war and came out of it good enough shape for a future service, if necessary.

    Sources:

    (1) British Army WWI Medal Rolls Index Cards, 1914-1920

    (2) The Long, Long Trail – The British Army of 1914-1918 – for family historians
    http://www.1914-1918.net

    (3) WO329, RDF, British Army Medal Roles, Infantry Record Office, Dublin

    (4) 10th (Irish) Division – Wikipedia, the free encyclopaedia
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/10th_(Irish)_Division

    (5) 10th (Irish) Division – The Long, Long Trail, 1914-1918
    http://www.1914-1918.net/10div.htm

    (6) Royal Dublin Fusiliers – a forgotten regiment
    http://www.dublin-fusiliers.com/

    (7) Irish Battalions – RDF Major Battles
    http://www.greatwar.ie/ire_batmb.html

    (8) Family Tree, Genealogy and Census Records – Ancestry.co.uk
    http://www.ancestry.co.uk/

    (9) The Pals at Suvla Bay
    By Henry Hanna, K.C.

    #14885

    noor
    Participant

    Thomas McKenna (1889 – 28.02.1917)
    Private
    1st/8th Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers

    British War Medal – 23148 Pte T McKenna, Royal Dublin Fusiliers

    Thomas was entitled:

    Victory Medal (Roll B/101.B.9 Page 651)
    British War Medal (Roll B/101.B.9 Page 651)

    Thomas was born as a son of John and Catherine McKenna in 1889 on Kingscourt, Co. Cavan. His family were Agricultural Labourers and they were Roman Catholics. Thomas had as well three younger brothers; Patrick, John and Michael (11).

    When the Great War started, New Army battalions (often referred to as Kitchener’s Army) were formed, where man can sign up for three years or the duration of the war (whichever was the longer) (4).
    Thomas enlisted from Hamilton and was posted as a private to the Royal Dublin Fusiliers 8th Battalion, what was formed in September 1914 and was part of 48th Brigade in 16th (Irish) Division (6/9/10).
    Regarding his service number 23148, he enlisted around winter/spring 1915 (3).

    They received basic training mainly in Buttevant and Ballyhooley, after what battalion was moved to England in September 1915 to Blackdown near Aldershot in Surrey for 16th (Irish) Division final training (1/4).

    8th Battalion landed to the port of Le Havre on the 20th December 1915. However, looks like Thomas entered to France later on in 1916, because he wasn’t entitled for 1914-1915 Star what was issued to the soldiers in the British Expeditionary Force who served in any theatre of the War on the 5th August 1914 to 31st December 1915 (2/12).

    Most likely he got his first battle experience still with the 8th Battalion, who engaged in the horrific Battle of Hulluch 27th – 29th April 1916 (1/5/9).

    Some moment after March 1916, Private Thomas McKenna was transferred to the 1st Battalion of Royal Dublin Fusiliers who arrived to the France from Egypt and was part of 86th Brigade, 29th Division, what was concentrated in the area east of Pont Remy between 15th and 29th March (4).

    But because both battalions took part of the Battle of Somme (1st July–18th November 1916), most likely Thomas eye witnessed some of the moments in the Royal Dublin Fusiliers hardest history (4/5):

    First Day of the Somme on the 1st July 1st Battalion
    Capture of Ginchy on the 9th September 8th Battalion

    Unfortunately his service records haven’t survived and also there aren’t notes about his wounds in the Irish publications at this period, so it is hard to find out extra details about Thomas’ service.

    End of the February 1917 1st Battalion had rest in the Bronfay and Hardecourt camp.
    War Diary states that on the 28th February 1917, Battalion attacked east of Sailly-Sailisel at 5:25 a “Potsdam trench” what they took after own artillery fire. Next objective was “Weimar” and “Palz trench” where they start reaching but their own artillery barrage and enemy machine gun fire caused many casualties. Also they found “Weimar trench” full of water. Lead of Captain Bagley men reached front of the wires of “Palz trench” but Germans machine gun fire caused more casualties. Also fusiliers run out of grenades at this time and they was forced to pull back to the “Potsdam trench”.

    At this day Private Thomas McKenna met his ultimate faith and got killed in action. Hid body never found (6/7/8).

    Thomas is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, memorial reference Pier and Face 16 C.

    There is all together 377 Royal Dublin Fusiliers buried/commemorated in this memorial (1). Also he is commemorated in the War Memorial in the Bridge Street, Banbridge, Co. Down (8).

    Source:

    (1) Royal Dublin Fusiliers – a forgotten regiment
    http://www.dublin-fusiliers.com/

    (2) British Army WWI Medal Rolls Index Cards, 1914-1920
    http://search.ancestry.co.uk

    (3) Army Service Numbers 1881-1918
    http://armyservicenumbers.blogspot.com/

    (4) The Long, Long Trail – The British Army of 1914-1918 – for family historians
    http://www.1914-1918.net

    (5) Royal Dublin Fusiliers – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Dublin_Fusiliers

    (6) UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919
    http://search.ancestry.co.uk

    (7) Commonwealth War Graves Commission
    http://www.cwgc.org

    (8) Irish War Memorials
    http://www.irishwarmemorials.ie

    (9) Ireland Unknown Soldiers, The 16th (Irish) Division in the Great War
    by Terence Denman

    (10) 16th (Irish) Division – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/16th_(Irish)_Division

    (11) National Archives: Census of Ireland 1901/1911
    http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie

    (12) British Campaign Medals, 1914-2005 (Shire Library)
    by Peter Duckers

    #14886

    noor
    Participant

    Thiepval memorial

    Plate with his name on the left-top courner

    Scetch from Thomas last day fighting area from battalion’s war diary

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