India Mutiny Medal – 1st Bombay European Fusiliers

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This topic contains 4 replies, has 3,019 voices, and was last updated by  noor 3 years, 4 months ago.

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  • #12360

    noor
    Participant

    Bartholomew (Barthomew) Narry (1825-1907(?))
    Private, 1169
    1st Bombay European Fusiliers (2nd Royal Dublin Fusiliers)

    Entitled:
    – Punjab Medal 1848-49 with the clasps “Mooltan” and “Goojerat”
    – India Mutiny Medal without the clasp

    Bartholomew was born in Templeboyle, Dromore, Co. Sligo in 1825. On the 22nd March 1845, when he reached 20 years of age, he attested at Athlone for military service with the 1st Bombay European Fusiliers. He gave his previous trade as a labourer it was recorded that his height was 5 feet 7 ½ inches, he had eyes grey and brown hair. He lived in Tubbercurry, Co. Sligo at this time.

    After he embarked to India, he was posted to the 1st Bombay European Fusiliers with the Regimental Number 1169, where he served for his entire military career. At this time, the unit was commanded by the Honorable East India Company.

    After a few years of service in India, his unit took part in the Second Anglo-Sikh War (1848-1849) against Sikh Empire. Bartholomew took part in the siege of Multan (07.09. 1848 – 22.01. 1849). During the storming of the fortress of Mooltan on the 2nd January 1849, the 1st Bombay European Fusiliers carried the Kooni Boorj breach, where the Queen’s Colour of the regiment were planted by Sergeant (afterwards Major) John Bennett, who was awarded a commission for his bravery on this occasion, the pike of the colour being severed by a bullet as he held it. For their services at the storming of Mooltan, the 1st Bombay European Fusiliers were awarded the battle honour "Mooltan".

    Narry also took part in the Battle of Goojerat under Brigadier Dundas’ (Bombay Army) on the 21st February 1849. This convincing victory by Gough’s army brought the Sikh War to an end and brought about the annexation of the Punjab into British India.
    As a result of that, Private Narry was awarded with the Punjab medal with the clasps “Mooltan” and “Goojerat” (The 1st Bombay European Fusiliers received 1225 medals: 124 without the clasp, 132 medals with the clasp “Mooltan” and 969 with the clasps “Mooltan” and “Goojerat”).

    Next, he received India Mutiny Medal without any clasps for his service during the Indian Mutiny (1857–1859). The Mutiny medal was issued for service in suppressing the outbreak of the 10th Bengal Light Cavalry at Ferozepore on 19th August.

    During the suppression of this outbreak the 1st Bombay Europeans lost 1 officer who was killed and 7 men who were wounded.
    Because he was entitled to a medal without any clasps, it is possible to say that he didn’t take part in any major actions.

    Based on the 1861 Worldwide Soldier Index, Private Narry was stationed at Poona, East Indies (Pune – cantonment town and as the "monsoon capital" of the Bombay Presidency).
    As with all other "European" units of the Honorable East India Company, they were placed under the command of the Victorian Crown in 1858, and formally moved into the British Army in 1862, called 103rd Regiment of Foot (Royal Bombay Fusiliers).

    Bartholomew Narry serviced as a private for a total of 22 years and 126 days. 20 years and 65 days he served in India, during which, he received Good Conduct pay on the:

    22nd March 1850
    22nd March 1855
    19th September 1858
    23rd October 1859
    22 October 1863

    Each year just a handful of outstanding soldiers of the regiment were chosen for good conduct medals and gratuities. There were two lists, one for men recommended for the Good Conduct Medal without a gratuity, and one for gratuities – £5 to a private, £10 to a corporal, and £15 to a sergeant.

    His conduct was described as very good and he had three Good Conduct badges.
    Also his name appeared in the Defaulters Book and he had been once tried by Court Martial.

    Private Narry served until 26th August 1865, when he must been 40 years old. He was discharged due to his own request.

    Sources:

    (1) http://www.britishmedals.us/files/imaddenda.htm

    (2) http://www.theoriginalrecord.com/databa … decade/187

    (3) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/103rd_Regi … _Fusiliers)

    (4) British Army Service Records 1760-1915
    The National Archives reference WO97 / 1682 / 80

    (4) Confirms no clasp for Mutiny medal
    The National Archives reference WO12 / 9929

    #15833

    Frank Dutil
    Participant

    Sweet! Very interesting, thanks for sharing this researched set! 8-)

    #15834

    noor
    Participant

    Thanks Frank!

    Yes, it is one of my oldest Dubs related awards at the moment – and I was incredible lucky to get his papers.

    I strongly feel that if I collect one regiment only, then the study must be done as far back it’s possible (to understand well regimental history – especially to me, who do not know so much details of British military past), and not only post 1881 period, when they became known as a Royal Dublin Fusiliers 2nd Battalion.

    More will follow,

    Timo

    #15835

    John_Allgood
    Keymaster

    Timo,

    Nice write up for the medal. I was not aware of "theoriginalrecord" website, thanks for adding that bit of info. Now you just have to find his Punjab medal.

    Best wishes,

    John

    #17266

    thomasusa80
    Member

    Thanks Frank!

    Yes, it is one of my oldest Dubs related awards at the moment – and I was incredible lucky to get his papers.

    I strongly feel that if I collect one regiment only, then the study must be done as far back it’s possible (to understand well regimental history – especially to me, who do not know so much details of British military past), and not only post 1881 period, when they became known as a Royal Dublin Fusiliers 2nd Battalion.

    More will follow,

    Timo

    Of course, it can be one among my own earliest Dubs linked accolades at the moment : and We was amazing blessed to obtain the paperwork.

    We firmly think only acquire one particular regiment just, then the research has to be done seeing that significantly returning it’s achievable (to realize nicely regimental record – especially to my opinion, exactly who do not know so much details of British army past), but not just post 1881 time period, when they started to be often known as a new Noble Dublin Fusiliers subsequent Battalion.

    Far more follows,

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